Knuckles and Gloves

Front Cover
W. Collins sons & Company, Limited, 1922 - Boxing - 217 pages
 

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Contents

I
vii
II
1
III
3
IV
7
V
12
VI
23
VII
30
VIII
34
XX
99
XXI
102
XXII
107
XXIII
119
XXIV
121
XXV
127
XXVI
133
XXVII
139

IX
41
X
44
XI
55
XII
60
XIII
63
XIV
68
XV
72
XVI
80
XVII
85
XVIII
88
XIX
93
XXVIII
147
XXIX
154
XXX
158
XXXI
163
XXXII
170
XXXIII
176
XXXIV
183
XXXV
189
XXXVI
193
XXXVII
201
Copyright

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Page 65 - ... rapidity of electricity or lightning, and you imagined he would only be lifted up to be knocked down again. It was as if Hickman held a sword or. a fire in that right hand of his, and directed it against an unarmed body. They met again, and Neate seemed not cowed, but particularly cautious. I saw his teeth clenched together and his brows knit close against the sun. He held out both his arms at full length straight before him, like two sledge-hammers, and raised his left an inch or two higher.
Page xxviii - Hail to thee, Tom of Bedford, or by whatever name it may please thee to be called, Spring or Winter. Hail to thee, six-foot Englishman of the brown eye, worthy to have carried a six-foot bow at Flodden, where England's yeomen triumphed over Scotland's king, his clans and chivalry.
Page xxv - That to prevent disputes, in every main battle, the principals shall, on the coming on the stage, choose from among the gentlemen present two umpires, who shall absolutely decide all disputes that may arise about the battle ; and if the two umpires cannot agree, the said umpires to choose a third, who is to determine it.
Page 207 - That a blow struck when a man is thrown or down, shall be deemed foul. That a man with one knee and one hand on the ground, or with both knees on the ground, shall be deemed down; and a blow given in either of those positions shall be considered foul, providing always that, when in such position, the man so down shall not himself strike or attempt to strike.
Page 206 - That the seconds and bottle-holders shall not interfere, advise, or direct the adversary of their principal, and shall refrain from all offensive and irritating expressions, in all respects conducting themselves with order and decorum, and confine themselves to the diligent and careful discharge of their duties to their principals. 12. That in picking up their men, should the seconds or bottle-holders wilfully injure the antagonist of their principal, the latter shall be deemed to have forfeited...
Page xxvi - God that it is ; all I have to say is, that the French still live on the other side of the water, and are still casting their eyes hitherward— and that in the days of pugilism it was no vain boast to say, that one Englishman was a match for two of t'other race ; at present it would be a vain boast to say so, for these are not the days of pugilism.
Page 21 - I have been sparring with Jackson for exercise this morning ; and mean to continue and renew my acquaintance with the muffles. My chest, and arms, and wind are in very good plight, and I am not in flesh. I used to be a hard hitter, and my arms are very long for my height (5 feet 8J inches). At any rate, exercise is good, and this the severest of all ; fencing and the broad-sword never fatigued me half so much.
Page 206 - ... 10. That on no consideration whatever shall any person be permitted to enter the ring during the battle, nor till it shall have been concluded; and that in the event of such unfair practice, or the ropes...
Page xxv - That in order to prevent any disputes, the time a man lies after a fall, if the second does not bring his man to the side of the square, within the space of half a minute, he shall be deemed a beaten man.
Page xxvi - I tell you what, my boy ; I honour you, and, provided your education had been a little less limited, I should have been glad to see you here in company with Parr and Whiter ; both can box. Boxing is, as you say, a noble art — a truly English art ; may I never see the day when Englishmen shall feel ashamed of it, or blacklegs and blackguards bring it into disgrace ! I am a magistrate, and, of course, cannot patronise the thing very openly, yet I sometimes see a prize-fight. I saw the Game Chicken...

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