Tort, Custom, and Karma: Globalization and Legal Consciousness in Thailand

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Stanford University Press, Feb 12, 2010 - Law - 190 pages
Diverse societies are now connected by globalization, but how do ordinary people feel about law as they cope day-to-day with a transformed world? Tort, Custom, and Karma examines how rapid societal changes, economic development, and integration into global markets have affected ordinary people's perceptions of law, with a special focus on the narratives of men and women who have suffered serious injuries in the province of Chiangmai, Thailand.

This work embraces neither the conventional view that increasing global connections spread the spirit of liberal legalism, nor its antithesis that backlash to interconnection leads to ideologies such as religious fundamentalism. Instead, it looks specifically at how a person's changing ideas of community, legal justice, and religious belief in turn transform the role of law particularly as a viable form of redress for injury. This revealing look at fundamental shifts in the interconnections between globalization, state law, and customary practices uncovers a pattern of increasing remoteness from law that deserves immediate attention.
 

Contents

Introduction
1
1 Buajans Injury Narrative
21
A History of Globalizations
33
3 State Law and the Law of Sacred Centers
47
4 Injury Practices in a Transformed Society
77
5 Litigation
95
6 Justice
123
7 Mings Injury Narrative
140
Conclusion
153
Notes
165
Glossary of Thai Words and Phrases
173
Names of Injury Victims Referenced in Text
175
Bibliography
177
Index
185
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About the author (2010)

David M. Engel is SUNY Distinguished Service Professor at the Law School of the University at Buffalo. His most recent book is Fault Lines: Tort Law and Cultural Practice (Stanford, 2009). Jaruwan S. Engel is an author, Thai language instructor, and translator, and was formerly Lecturer and Coordinator of the Thai Language Program at the University at Buffalo.

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