The Island of Cuba

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Derby & Jackson, 1856 - Slavery - 397 pages
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Page 39 - Eastern policy to the policy affecting all parts of the world, and I am heartily rejoiced to say, that there is no portion of the two hemispheres with regard to which the policy of the two countries, however heretofore antagonistic, is not now in entire harmony.
Page 33 - Cuba form a large portion, and by no means an unimportant one, of the population of Cuba, and that any steps taken to provide for their emancipation would, therefore, as far as the black population is concerned, be quite in unison -with the recommendation made by Her Majesty's Government, that measures should be adopted for contenting the people of Cuba, with a view to secure the...
Page 33 - Cuba, with a view to secure the connection between that island and the Spanish Crown; and it must be evident that if the negro population of Cuba were rendered free, that fact would create a most powerful element of resistance to arty scheme for annexing Cuba to the United States, where slavery still exists.
Page 35 - Your lordship may be assured, that however friendly the councils of her majesty may be to Spain; whatever may be the interest of this country not to see Cuba in the hands of any other power than Spain ; yet, in the eyes of the people of this country, the destruction of a trade which conveys the natives of Africa to become slaves in Cuba will furnish a large compensation for such a transfer. For such an exhibition of public feeling, the government of Spain should be prepared.
Page 38 - Great Britain must at once resume her entire liberty ; and upon any occasion that may call for it, be free to act either singly or in conjunction with other Powers, as to her may seem fit.
Page 38 - Governments has not been confined to the Eastern Question. The happy accord and good understanding between France and England have been extended beyond Eastern policy to the policy affecting all parts of the world, and . . . that there is no portion of the two hemispheres with regard to which the policy of the two countries, however heretofore antagonistic, is not now in entire harmony.
Page 381 - This Creature is about the Bigness of a Horse, and 10 or 12 Foot long. The Mouth of it is much like the Mouth of a Cow, having great thick Lips. The Eyes are no bigger than a small Pea, the Ears are only two small holes on each side of the Head. The Neck is short and thick, bigger than the Head. The biggest Part of this Creature is at the Shoulders, where it hath two large Fins, one on each side of its Belly. Under each of these Fins the Female hath a small Dug to suckle her young.
Page 160 - Toluca, and the Cofre of Perote, for these do not seem to differ specifically from the pinus occidentalis of the Antilles, as described by Schwartz. But these pines, which we find at the level of the sea in Cuba, between the 20 and 22 of latitude, and only upon its southern side, do not descend lower than 3,200 feet above that level upon the Mexican continent, between the parallels of 17^ and 19.
Page 381 - ... which is flat, and about 14 inches broad, and 20 inches long, and in the middle 4 or 5 inches thick, but about the edges of it not above 2 inches thick. From the Head to the Tail it is round and smooth without any Fin but those two before mentioned.
Page 381 - ... holes on each side of the Head. The Neck is short and thick, bigger than the Head. The biggest part of this Creature is at the Shoulders, where it hath two large Fins, one on each side of its Belly. Under each of these Fins the Female hath a small Dug to suckle her young. From the Shoulders towards the Tail it retains its bigness for about a foot, then groweth smaller and smaller to the very Tail, which is flat, and about 14 inches broad, and 20 inches long, and in the middle 4 or 5 inches thick,...

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