I Thought It Was Just Me (but it isn't): Making the Journey from "What Will People Think?" to "I Am Enough"

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Penguin, Feb 1, 2007 - Self-Help - 336 pages
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Researcher, thought leader, and New York Times bestselling author Brené Brown offers a liberating study on the importance of our imperfections—both to our relationships and to our own sense of self

The quest for perfection is exhausting and unrelenting. There is a constant barrage of social expectations that teach us that being imperfect is synonymous with being inadequate. Everywhere we turn, there are messages that tell us who, what and how we’re supposed to be. So, we learn to hide our struggles and protect ourselves from shame, judgment, criticism and blame by seeking safety in pretending and perfection.

Brené Brown, PhD, LMSW, is the leading authority on the power of vulnerability, and has inspired thousands through her top-selling books Daring Greatly, Rising Strong, and The Gifts of Imperfection, her wildly popular TEDx talks, and a PBS special. Based on seven years of her ground-breaking research and hundreds of interviews, I Thought It Was Just Me shines a long-overdue light on an important truth: Our imperfections are what connect us to each other and to our humanity. Our vulnerabilities are not weaknesses; they are powerful reminders to keep our hearts and minds open to the reality that we’re all in this together.

Brown writes, “We need our lives back. It’s time to reclaim the gifts of imperfection—the courage to be real, the compassion we need to love ourselves and others, and the connection that gives true purpose and meaning to life. These are the gifts that bring love, laughter, gratitude, empathy and joy into our lives.”
 

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User Review  - familyresourcecentre - LibraryThing

Review by Family Resource Centre staff, Jessica: "She assigns words to a concept that was previously ambiguous." Brene Brown is currently the most celebrated author regarding the topic of shame. In ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - caslater83 - LibraryThing

There is no perfect way to say this, but while it's a good book, it's never going to be something that I'll reread. Just to be clear, this was a book of the month for my book club. It's targeted ... Read full review

Contents

Title Page
TWO Shame Resilience and the Power of Empathy
Recognizing Shame and Understanding Our Triggers
Practicing Critical Awareness
Reaching
Speaking Shame
SEVEN Practicing Courage in a Culture of Fear
EIGHT Practicing Compassion in a Culture of Blame
NINE Practicing Connection in a Culture of Disconnection
TEN Creating a Culture of Connection
RECOMMENDATIONS RESOURCES AND REFERENCES
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About the author (2007)

Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston, where she holds the Huffington Foundation–Brené Brown Endowed Chair at the Graduate College of Social Work. She is also a visiting professor in management at the University of Texas at Austin McCombs School of Business. Brown has spent the past two decades studying courage, vulnerability, shame, and empathy and is the author of five #1 New York Times bestsellers: The Gifts of Imperfection, Daring Greatly, Rising Strong, Braving the Wilderness, and her latest book, Dare to Lead, which is the culmination of a seven-year study on courage and leadership. She hosts the Unlocking Us and Dare to Lead podcasts, and her TEDx talk, “The Power of Vulnerability,” is one of the top five most-viewed TED talks in the world with more than 50 million views. She is also the first researcher to have a filmed lecture on Netflix. The Call to Courage special debuted on the streaming service on April 19, 2019. Brené Brown lives in Houston, Texas, with her husband, Steve. They have two children, Ellen and Charlie.

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