The Origins and Role of Same-Sex Relations in Human Societies

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McFarland, Oct 3, 2011 - Social Science - 478 pages
3 Reviews
This groundbreaking work draws on a vast range of research into human sexuality to demonstrate that homosexuality is not a phenomenon limited to a small minority of society, but is an aspect of a complex sexual harmony that the human race inherited from its animal ancestors. Through a survey of the patterns of sexual expression found among animals and among societies around the world, and an examination of the functional role homosexual behavior has played among animal species and human societies alike, the author arrives at some provocative conclusions: that a homosexual or bisexual phase is a normal part of sexual development, that same-sex relations play an important balancing role in regulating human reproduction, that many societies have institutionalized homosexual traditions in the past, and that the harsh condemnation of homosexuality in Western society is a relatively recent phenomenon, unique among world societies throughout history. This well researched and meticulously documented book is the first that integrates into a coherent picture the startling revelations about human sexuality coming from the recent work of sexual researchers, psychologists, anthropologists and historians. The view that emerges, of an ambisexual human species whose complex sexual harmony is being thwarted by the imposition of an artificial understanding of nature, represents a new way of thinking about sex.
 

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Ignore that so called man who wants 'facts' because he really stretches that definition to the point of applying empiricism when it must not be applied blindly (as if taken for granted), but the reality otherwise is quite blurry; this is a good introductory primer to this controversial topic that has been for the most part, tainted with mistranslations and improper contextualizations.  

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I find the author arrives at many assumptions that are biblically unsubstantiated. One example is the assumption that David and Johnatin were lovers. It is understood that the stripping off of one's outer garments and the presenting of one's personal armor denotes sexual relationship. Secondly, The meeting of minds via conversation that leads to a soul binding relationship denotes sexual relationship. Thirdly, no directly previously expressed law written in the scriptures against homosexuality. Fact: Giving personal gifts does not in itself denote sexual relationship. Second, One person can be bound to another without sexuality and thirdly most importantly the scriptures do not shy away from sexual language stating explicitly Adam 'knew' Eve his wife. This is not stated for David and Jonathan. Also note that the command to multiply the human species is given as a mandate. This cannot be accomplished by same sex sexual relationship. I thought in reading the author's article I would find sound facts. I am disappointed.  

Contents

The Heterosexual Myth
5
THE INHERITANCE OF NATURE
11
SameSex Behavior Among Indigenous Peoples
26
The Ambisexual Harmony of Human Sexuality
57
AMBISEXUAL TRADITIONS IN WORLD CIVILIZATIONS
79
Homosexual Customs of the Early IndoEuropeans
115
The Age of HeroesLoveInspired Valor
130
Educational Homosexuality in Classical Greece
144
A Thousand Years of Noble Love in Japan
269
Homosexual Love in the World of Islam
298
SEXUAL NEUROSIS IN WESTERN SOCIETY
319
The Propagation of Neurosis
359
Authoritarian Religion versus Human Ambisexuality
389
Sexual Neurosis in Modern Society
426
Chapter Notes
439
Bibliography
457

Homosexual Customs in
186
The Christianized Empire and
209
The Ancient Traditions of SameSex Love in China
234

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About the author (2011)

Independent writer James Neill has spent 12 years researching the role of homosexuality in society and in nature. A consultant in the information services industry, he worked previously in news and public affairs in Washington, D.C. as a writer and editor.

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