Obsolescent Capitalism: Contemporary Politics and Global Disorder

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Zed Books, 2003 - Biography & Autobiography - 190 pages
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'Globalization is just another word for US dominance' - Henry Kissinger

Capitalism is going senile. Its ambition is now restricted to maintaining the wealth of the wealthy in the world, while the poor, condemned to remain out of the loop, are increasingly demonized as the enemy.

This is the theme of Samir Amin's major new book, in which the celebrated analyst presents a synoptic view of capitalism's future.

He depicts a world in which NATO and socalled coalitions of the willing have taken over the role of the United Nations, in which US hegemony is more or less complete, in which millions are condemned to die in order to preserve the social order of the US, Europe and Japan. 

Samir Amin's analyses of the Gulf War, the wars in former Yugoslavia and the war in Central Asia reveal the scope of US strategic aims. He explains why Macdonald's hamburgers need McDonnell-Douglas's F-16s, arguing that the political and military dimension of US dominance is as significant as US economic preponderance in determining the future of capitalist development - with the recent US invasion and occupation of Iraq being a confirmation of Amin's prescient thesis.
 

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Contents

Section 1
13
Section 2
13
Section 3
13
Section 4
27
Section 5
28
Section 6
46
Section 7
67
Section 8
68
Section 14
81
Section 15
82
Section 16
83
Section 17
84
Section 18
85
Section 19
86
Section 20
87
Section 21
88

Section 9
76
Section 10
90
Section 11
90
Section 12
91
Section 13
78
Section 22
89
Section 23
90
Section 24
91
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About the author (2003)

Samir Amin has been Director of IDEP (the United Nations African Institute for Planning) from 1970 to 1980; the Director of the Third World Forum in Dakar, Senegal; and a co-founder of the World Forum for Alternatives.

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