Social Zooarchaeology: Humans and Animals in Prehistory

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Cambridge University Press, Nov 14, 2011 - Social Science
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This is the first book to provide a systematic overview of social zooarchaeology, which takes a holistic view of human-animal relations in the past. Until recently, archaeological analysis of faunal evidence has primarily focused on the role of animals in the human diet and subsistence economy. This book, however, argues that animals have always played many more roles in human societies: as wealth, companions, spirit helpers, sacrificial victims, totems, centerpieces of feasts, objects of taboos, and more. These social factors are as significant as taphonomic processes in shaping animal bone assemblages. Nerissa Russell uses evidence derived from not only zooarchaeology, but also ethnography, history and classical studies, to suggest the range of human-animal relationships and to examine their importance in human society. Through exploring the significance of animals to ancient humans, this book provides a richer picture of past societies.
 

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Contents

1 Beyond protein and calories
1
2 Animal symbols
11
3 Animals in ritual
52
4 Hunting and humanity
144
5 Extinctions
176
6 Domestication as a humananimal relationship
207
7 Pets and other humananimal relationships
259
8 Animal wealth
297
9 Meat beyond diet
358
10 Studying humananimal relations
395
References
401
Index
543
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About the author (2011)

Nerissa Russell is Associate Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology at Cornell University. Her research focuses on the full range of human-animal relations, with particular emphasis on the social and symbolic roles of animals for ancient people. She has published more than forty book chapters and articles in journals including Antiquity, Paleorient and the Journal of Archaeological Science.

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