The Classic: Literary Images of Permanence and Change

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Harvard University Press, Jan 1, 1983 - Literary Criticism - 141 pages
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Attempts to determine the criteria for classical literature through an analysis of the social and intellectual importance of great works of the past.

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In response to Eliot's question 'what is a classic?' Kermode delivered the 1973 T.S. Eliot Memorial Lectures, weaving in and out of the works of Virgil, Spenser, Marvell, Milton, Hawthorne, and Emily ... Read full review

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About the author (1983)

Sir John Frank Kermode, November 29, 1919 - August 17, 2010 John Kermode was a British literary critic best known for his work The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction, published in 1967 (revised 2000), and for his extensive book-reviewing and editing. He was the Lord Northcliffe Professor of Modern English Literature at University College London and the King Edward VII Professor of English Literature at Cambridge University. Kermode served during World War II with the Royal Navy. After the war, Kermode held positions at Manchester University, Bristol University, University College of London, and Cambridge University, all in England, and at Columbia University in New York City. He was Charles E. Norton Professor at Harvard University in 1977-78 and Henry Luce Professor at Yale University in 1994. Kermode wrote several books on literary figures, including D.H. Lawrence and Wallace Stevens. His works of criticism include An Appetite for Poetry and The Art of Telling. Kermode was also the editor of the cultural journal, Encounter and his memoir, Not Entitled, was published in 1995. Kermode serves on the editorial board of the London Review of Books and Common Knowledge and has acted as judge for the Booker Prize. He was knighted for his service to English literature and he was named a Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1999. He died in Cambridge on August 17, 2010.

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