Starship Troopers

Front Cover
Penguin, May 15, 1987 - Fiction - 352 pages
116 Reviews
In Robert A. Heinlein’s controversial Hugo Award-winning bestseller, a recruit of the future goes through the toughest boot camp in the Universe—and into battle against mankind’s most alarming enemy...

Johnnie Rico never really intended to join up—and definitely not the infantry. But now that he’s in the thick of it, trying to get through combat training harder than anything he could have imagined, he knows everyone in his unit is one bad move away from buying the farm in the interstellar war the Terran Federation is waging against the Arachnids.

Because everyone in the Mobile Infantry fights. And if the training doesn’t kill you, the Bugs are more than ready to finish the job...

“A classic…If you want a great military adventure, this one is for you.”—All SciFi
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - empress8411 - LibraryThing

After seeing the movie, I thought I should actually read the book. It is NOTHING like the movie. Really. Other than the names and the bugs, and the fact Buenos Aries gets destroyed, nothing like the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - ChelleBearss - LibraryThing

Turns out I do not enjoy science fiction. This was a good book for sure, but I found it very hard to slug throught it just because I did not find it very interesting. Just not my cup of tea. Read full review

All 14 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
26
Section 3
52
Section 4
64
Section 5
75
Section 6
98
Section 7
124
Section 8
137
Section 11
186
Section 12
211
Section 13
258
Section 14
333
Section 15
337
Section 16
339
Section 17
341
Section 18
342

Section 9
154
Section 10
165

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About the author (1987)

Robert Anson Heinlein was born in Missouri in 1907, and was raised there. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1929, but was forced by illness to retire from the Navy in 1934. He settled in California and over the next five years held a variety of jobs while doing post-graduate work in mathematics and physics at the University of California. In 1939 he sold his first science fiction story to Astounding magazine and soon devoted himself to the genre.

He was a four-time winner of the Hugo Award for his novels Stranger in a Strange Land (1961), Starship Troopers (1959), Double Star (1956), and The Moon is a Harsh Mistress (1966). His Future History series, incorporating both short stories and novels, was first mapped out in 1941. The series charts the social, political, and technological changes shaping human society from the present through several centuries into the future.

Robert A. Heinlein’s books were among the first works of science fiction to reach bestseller status in both hardcover and paperback. He continued to work into his eighties, and his work never ceased to amaze, to entertain, and to generate controversy. By the time he died, in 1988, it was evident that he was one of the formative talents of science fiction: a writer whose unique vision, unflagging energy, and persistence, over the course of five decades, made a great impact on the American mind.

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