The Power and the Glory

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Penguin, 1990 - Fiction - 221 pages
25 Reviews
"Graham Greene's masterpiece" John Updike)
In a poor, remote section of Southern Mexico, the paramilitary group, the Red Shirts have taken control. God has been outlawed, and the priests have been systematically hunted down and killed. Now, the last priest is on the run. Too human for heroism, too humble for martyrdom, the nameless little worldly “whiskey priest” is nevertheless impelled toward his squalid Calvary as much by his own compassion for humanity as by the efforts of his pursuers.
 
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Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - S Thomas - Goodreads

This is a story where in simple terms everybody is a bad guy. From the tormented, alcoholic Catholic priest on the run to the zealous police lieutenant who is hunting the priest in order to wipe out ... Read full review

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - Joe Gisondi - Goodreads

Ever expanding depth. I wish there were more out to read about this book, the sparknotes suck and I think missed a lot. I took a lot from this, but am not sure if it was Greene's intention to leave me with what I thought about it. Read full review

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Selected pages

Contents

PART ONE
7
THE CAPITAL
19
THE RIVER
30
THE BYSTANDERS
45
PART TWO
59
Chapter 2
103
Chapter 3
122
Chapter 4
140
PART THREE
161
Chapter 2
183
Chapter 3
190
Chapter 4
202
PART FOUR
211
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Graham Greene (1904-1991), whose long life nearly spanned the length of the twentieth century, was one of its greatest novelists. Educated at Berkhamsted School and Balliol College, Oxford, he started his career as a sub-editor of the London TimesHe began to attract notice as a novelist with his fourth book, Orient Expressin 1932. In 1935, he trekked across northern Liberia, his first experience in Africa, told in A Journey Without Maps (1936). He converted to Catholicism in 1926, an edifying decision, and reported on religious persecution in Mexico in 1938 in The Lawless Roadswhich served as a background for his famous The Power and the Glory, one of several “Catholic” novels (Brighton RockThe Heart of the MatterThe End of the Affair). During the war he worked for the British secret service in Sierra Leone; afterward, he began wide-ranging travels as a journalist, which were reflected in novels such as The Quiet AmericanOur Man in HavanaThe ComediansTravels with My AuntThe Honorary ConsulThe Human FactorMonsignor Quixoteand The Captain and the EnemyAs well as his many novels, Graham Greene wrote several collections of short stories, four travel books, six plays, two books of autobiography, A Sort of Life and Ways of Escape, two biographies, and four books for children. He also contributed hundreds of essays and film and book reviews to The Spectator and other journals, many of which appear in the late collection ReflectionsMost of his novels have been filmed, including The Third Man, which the author first wrote as a film treatment. Graham Greene was named Companion of Honour and received the Order of Merit among numerous other awards.

John Updike author of Rabbit, Run and other celebrated works, is a preeminent American novelist, short story writer, essayist, and poet.


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