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Graham Greene was a great novelist in twentieath century. He briefly explain the charecter of the protogonist by wearing ugly cloth and not take care of himself. The author has introduce the Priest as a stranger, mysterious person and a kind man. we can find the priest as a stranger, his behaviour is awkward and his ways are secretive. We find the puzzle in his charecter. According to Christianity priest should not drink alcohol and having an illegal affair with a women is a sin but in this novel the priest has all the behaviour. In catholic principle priest were not permited to marry, they have to sacrifice their life for God.
In climax of the scene he repent for his sin and he was executed for preaching Christianity.
 

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AMBIVALENCE --THE TWENTIETH CENTURY DILEMMA
Graham Greene’s novel The Power and the Glory celebrates ambivalence that one is baffled to find in many of the focal characters in the novel. As a word
belonging to the domain of Psychology, ambivalence denotes “the coexistence within an individual of positive and negative feelings toward the same person, object, or action, simultaneously drawing him or her in opposite directions”.
The contrary pulls are obviously dismantled by the novelist.The whisky priest acts against the injunction of the Catholic Church and fathered a child. The priest's name sheds much light on the nefarious ways that he has clung to. Notwithstanding the ungodly ways, he displays great heroism to attend to the confession of the dying man though he suspects that the one who ( The Mestizo) has informed about it would enact Judas’ role. So is the case with the lieutenant who is hell-bent on capturing the whisky priest as he despises catholic creed and more importantly as he is obliged to obey the authorities’ dictates. He is convinced that socialist pattern of society can alone redeem people from their abject poverty and seediness of life. What is more alluring is that the novelist does not leave pulls off the sanctimonious veils of the church, the totalitarian state and the principles they have espoused to. He brushes aside with a sledge-hammer the binary reality in which we have cosily nestled into, to escape from the clumsiness of our existence.
Here is a novel which delineates characters in many shades. The beauty of the novel, indeed, is in its prismatic efforescence.
Dr V. Pala Prasada Rao
JKC College, Guntur-6
 

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The hypocrisy of the Catholic church is not the focus of this book but certainly is the target. The main character, a drunken pedophile priest, is an echo of the child abusers and liars that populate the semi-literate Catholic church today. How many mea culpas with a forgiveness to buy today? Greene delivers the verdict at the end. 

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Penguin Classics. 240 pp. $15.
There is something inextricably fascinating about the Catholic church. It’s quite a public denomination, and one that lends itself to political involvement quite
easily. Especially in Mexico during the 1930s, when recognizing oneself as Catholic or, even moreso, a Catholic priest, was an automatic verbal signature to your death wish.
The whiskey priest, the only identification we’re given of our protagonist, plagues himself with the struggle between giving himself up as a martyr, and validating his mission on the physical earth. The government has given him two options: marry and live life as an ordinary citizen, or die. Our priest can’t justify either as less of a cop-out, so he chooses option three: run.
The irony of this all is that as he is running he is trying to make a martyr of himself. While he is “home” to hide out for the night, the military comes through town demanding information regarding the rogue priest. The entire town knows that the priest is in and among them–his tattered clothing blends him into the rest of the citizens–but no one, including him, speaks up. They run through the line of men, asking names and relations. The priest gives a pseudonym, and for further incentive to confess the officers take a young man hostage. The priest cries out, “take me!” but he does not confess to being the priest. Had he said, “take me! I’m the priest!” they would have killed him in the morning. Instead he just looks like a heartbroken mentor.
Greene originally titled this book and had it published under the title”The Labyrinthine Ways.” A labyrinth is a maze that consists of one non-branching path the entire way through. Interestingly enough, nothing about this book represents a labyrinth. A labyrinth suggests that no choice is required, but whichever way this book lies the subjects are faced with two or more opportunities, and they are forced to make a decision.
What’s interesting about this novel is that Greene does not paint a clear picture of who should be sympathized with and who should be loathed. The priest is most sympathized because he is the hero of the novel, but he is constantly endangering those around him by not voluntarily martyring himself. He is a very human image of leadership within the Catholic church, but his obsession with brandy highlights the weaknesses in his morality. His counterpart, the lieutenant, is loathed because he is pursuing the whiskey priest throughout the novel, but one scene particularly reveals his intense compassion for children. The mestizo is probably the most hated character in the novel. But why shouldn’t he turn the priest in? He needs the money, after all.
A reader need not know the inner workings of Catholicism in order to appreciate this novel. It is strikingly grounded; every character, whether meant to be hero or villain, is united in their humanness. There is no perfection in this book. And more than anything, that element draws the reader into the pages and beyond the story.
 

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Not plot driven.

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - S Thomas - Goodreads

This is a story where in simple terms everybody is a bad guy. From the tormented, alcoholic Catholic priest on the run to the zealous police lieutenant who is hunting the priest in order to wipe out ... Read full review

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - Joe Gisondi - Goodreads

Ever expanding depth. I wish there were more out to read about this book, the sparknotes suck and I think missed a lot. I took a lot from this, but am not sure if it was Greene's intention to leave me with what I thought about it. Read full review

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - Clare Kathleen - Goodreads

Loved it. Thought that meant I loved Greene. Was kind of wrong. However, this novel is incomparable. Greene isn't fancy, but he gets the conscience of man. Read full review

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - Lynne - The Book Squirrel - Goodreads

Found the unabridged audio version of this in a charity shop so I am staying in all day, going to finish a throw for ex's sofa - christmas pressie, and listen to it. Read full review

Review: The Power and the Glory

User Review  - Brian - Goodreads

One of my all time favorites!!! Read full review

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