The Dying God: The Hidden History of Western Civilization

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iUniverse, 2002 - History - 460 pages
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Few would acknowledge that our knowledge of history could be significantly inaccurate. The most common conception of history is one that begins in Greece, the "cradle of Western civilization", then progresses through Rome, and finally Europe and America. However, this merely represents a strictly Western version of history, and one that is often confused with the history of the World. Fortunately though, recent scholarship has begun to elucidate the extent of the indebtedness of Western history to other civilizations, rendering our notion of "Western" civilization obsolete.

Rather, a more accurate assessment of the past will reveal a neglected account, the hidden history of Western civilization, which began in Mesopotamia, in the sixth century BC, with the birth of a tradition centered around the myth of a dying god. The development of this tradition led to the emergence of philosophy among the Greeks, then influenced the formation of Christianity, and was appropriated and elaborated upon by the Arabs during the Middle Ages. Ultimately, being introduced to Europe during the Crusades, it eventually spawned the Renaissance and the Enlightenment.

 

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Contents

The Sons of God
1
Venus
17
Baal
35
Hercules
62
Prometheus
81
Dionysus
93
Apollo
117
Enoch
146
Idris
247
Metratron
274
Baphomet
297
Percival
317
Hermes
337
Hiram
351
Lucifer
370
BIBLIOGRAPHY
383

Mithras
171
Logos
195
Thoth
211
Seth
222
INDEX
411
ENDNOTES
419
Copyright

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About the author (2002)

One of the most remarkable explorers of the nineteenth century, Livingstone sought first as a missionary and devout Christian to end the slave trade in Africa and then to locate the source of the Nile. In these attempts, he lost his wife, who caught a fever on an expedition in which she joined him. He discovered Victoria Falls and the lands between Nyasa and Tanganyika, encountering other hardships and tragedies in his double quest. He was apparently much beloved by Africans who knew him. He never abated in his efforts on their behalf. His association with Sir Henry Morton Stanley is well known. The latter had been sent to find him by an American newspaper when Livingstone was feared lost. The formal approach of Stanley's first remark on finding him in a remote African village, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume," amused the world, and the greeting became a byword. Stanley was with Livingstone in northern Tanganyika when the latter died. "Missionary Travels" (1857) is essentially the contemporary record of Livingstone's two journeys to northwestern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) in 1851-1853.

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