The History of English Poetry: From the Close of the Eleventh to the Commencement of the Eighteenth Century, Volume 1

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T. Tegg, 1824 - English poetry
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Page 162 - converted ideas of deformity into the true sublime, and rendered an image terrible, which in other hands would have probably been ridiculous. Methought his eyes Were two full moons, he had a thousand noses, Horns whelk'd and wav'd like the enridged sea. It was some fiend
Page ccv - scarce his speech began, When the strange partner seem'd no longer man: His youthful face grew more serenely sweet, His robe turn'd white, and flow'd upon his feet; Fair rounds of radiant points invest his hair; Celestial odours fill the purple air: And wings, whose colours
Page ccv - purple air: And wings, whose colours glitter'd on the day, Wide at his back their gradual plumes display, The form ethereal bursts upon his sight, And moves in all the majesty of light. The same apologue occurs, with some slight additions and variations
Page 82 - Also his two fellows saw come from heaven a hand, but they saw not the body; and then it came right to the vessel and took it and so bare it up to heaven. Sithence was there never no man so hardy for to say that he had seen the
Page ccl - Les simples qui n'ont point de quoy y mesler quelque chose du leur, et qui n'y apportent que le soin et la diligence de ramasser tout ce qui vient a leur notice, et d'enregistrer a la bonne foy toutes choses sans chois et sans triage, nous laissent le jugement
Page xlviii - supposed to be the descendants of the original Irish bards'. A writer of equal elegance and veracity relates, " that a gentleman of the north of Ireland has told me of his own experience, that in his wolf-huntings there, when he used to be abroad in the mountains three or four days together, and laid very ill
Page 173 - Over gestes it has the steem, Over all that is or was, If men it sayd as made Thomas; Bot I here it no man so say, That of some copple som is away; So thare fayre saying here beforne, Is thare travayle nere forlorne: Thai sayd it for pride and nobleye, That non were suylk as thei.
Page cclxviii - maist behold thy face, And thine own realmes in Lond of Faery, And in this antique image thy great ancestry '. It was not, however, solely from an unmeaning and a wanton spirit of refinement, that the fashion of resolving every thing into allegory so universally prevailed. The same apology may be offered for
Page clxxxii - sage and solemn tunes have sung, Of turneys and of trophies hung, Of forests and inchantments drear, Where more is meant than meets the car.
Page 62 - So shall thou instant reach the realm assign'd, In wondrous ships, self-moved, instinct with mind: No helm secures their course, no pilot guides, Like men intelligent, they plough the tides; Conscious of every coast and every bay That lies beneath the sun's alluring ray.