Daniel Martin

Front Cover
Cape, 1977 - Fiction - 704 pages
37 Reviews

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
15
4 stars
11
3 stars
4
2 stars
5
1 star
2

Review: Daniel Martin

User Review  - Montgomery Webster - Goodreads

Story: 2 / 10 Characters: 5 Setting: 7 Prose: 7 "Tell me a story." That's my reading philosophy. I pick up a book, either because it was recommended or won an annual genre award, but I don't read the ... Read full review

Review: Daniel Martin

User Review  - Robin Hawdon - Goodreads

Fowles is surely one of the UK's finest writers, and this to my mind is his finest (though not easiest) book. I often use his opening chapter, describing the main character's boyhood reminiscence of harvesting, as an example of the best kind of descriptive writing. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
7
Section 2
17
Section 3
25
Copyright

41 other sections not shown

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1977)

John Fowles was born in Essex, England, in 1926. He attended the University of Edinburgh for a short time, left to serve in the Royal Marines, and then returned to school at Oxford University, where he received a B.A. in French in 1950. Fowles taught English in France and Greece, as well as at St. Godric's College in London. Although the main theme in all Fowles's fiction is freedom, there are few other similarities in his books. He has deliberately chosen to explore a different style or genre for each novel: The Collector, his first novel, is an intellectual thriller; The Magus is an adolescent learning novel, tracing the emotional development of the central character; Daniel Martin tries, in the modernist style, to depict psychological reality; Mantissa is a comedic allegory that takes place entirely inside the narrator's head; Maggot combines mystery, science fiction, and history; and The Ebony Tower is a collection of short stories. Fowles explored yet another genre, historical fiction, with his best-known novel, The French Lieutenant's Woman, which received the W. H. Smith Literary Award in 1970 and was made into a movie, starring Meryl Streep and Jeremy Irons, in 1981. An intriguing feature of this novel is that it has three different endings. Fowles's nonfiction includes Aristos: A Self Portrait in Ideas; Poems; and Wormholes: Essays and Other Occasional Writings. In addition, he has written the text for several books of photographs, including The Tree, for which Fowles received the Christopher Award in 1982. He died on November 5, 2005 at the age of 79.