The Wrack of the Storm

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Dodd, Mead and Company, 1919 - World War, 1914-1918 - 330 pages
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Page 172 - ... commemoration. For heroes have the whole earth for their tomb; and in lands far from their own, where the column with its epitaph declares it, there is enshrined in every breast a record unwritten with no tablet to preserve it, except that of the heart.
Page 174 - ... children will be brought up till manhood at the public expense : the state thus offers a valuable prize, as the garland of victory in this race of valour, for the reward both of those who have fallen and their survivors. And where the rewards for merit are greatest, there are found the best citizens. ' And now that you have brought to a close your lamentations for your relatives, you may depart.
Page 169 - That panegyric is now in a great measure complete ; for the Athens that I have celebrated is only what the heroism of these and their like have made her, men whose fame, unlike that of most Hellenes,- will be found to be only commensurate with their deserts. And if a test of worth be wanted, it is to be found in their closing scene, and this not only in the cases in which it set the final seal upon their merit, but also in those in which it gave the first intimation of their having any.
Page 172 - For heroes have the whole earth for their tomb; and in lands far from their own, where the column with its epitaph declares it, there is enshrined in every breast a record unwritten with no tablet to preserve it, except that of the heart. These take as your model, and judging happiness to be the fruit of freedom and freedom of valour, never decline the dangers of war. For it is not the miserable that would most justly be unsparing of their lives; these have nothing to hope for: it is rather they...
Page 170 - ... the power of Athens, and feed your eyes upon her from day to day, till love of her fills your hearts ; and then when all her greatness shall break upon you, you must reflect that it was by courage, sense of duty, and a keen feeling of honour in action that men were...
Page 171 - ... you must yourselves realize the power of Athens and feed your eyes upon her from day to day, till love of her fills your hearts; and then, when all her greatness shall break upon you...
Page 172 - For it is not the miserable that would most justly be unsparing of their lives ; these have nothing to hope for : it is rather they to whom continued life may bring reverses as yet unknown, and to whom a fall, if it came, would be most tremendous in its consequences. And surely, to a man of spirit, the degradation of cowardice must be immeasurably more grievous than the unfelt death which strikes him in the midst of his strength and patriotism...
Page 170 - Thus choosing to die resisting, rather than to live submitting, they fled only from dishonor, but met danger face to face, and after one brief moment, while at the summit of their fortune, escaped, not from their fear, but from their glory.
Page 19 - German spirit, which is its unvarying element, will remain absolutely the same as it is today ; and would declare itself, when the opportunity came, under the same aspect with the same infamy. Through the whole course of history two distinct will-powers have been noticed that would seem to be the...
Page 171 - For this offering of their lives, made in common by them all, they, each of them individually, received that renown which never grows old, and, for a sepulcher, not so much that in which their bones have been deposited, but that noblest of shrines wherein their glory is laid up to be eternally remembered upon every occasion on which deed or story shall call for its commemoration.

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