The Kitchen and Fruit Gardener: A Select Manual of Kitchen Gardening and Culture of Fruits, Containing Familiar Directions for the Most Approved Practice in Each Department, Descriptions of Many Valuable Fruits, and a Calendar of Work to be Performed Each Month in the Year. The Whole Adapted to the Climate of the United States

Front Cover
Lea and Blanchard, 1847 - Flower gardening - 118 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 72 - Beneath those rugged elms, that yew tree's shade, Where heaves the turf in many a mould'ring heap, Each in his narrow cell for ever laid, The rude forefathers of the hamlet sleep.
Page 46 - How often have I blest the coming day, When toil remitting lent its turn to play, And all the village train, from labour free, Led up their sports beneath the spreading tree, While many a pastime circled in the shade...
Page 18 - Strain your line along the bed six inches from the edge ; then with a spade cut out a small trench or drill close to the line, about six inches deep, making that side next the line nearly upright...
Page viii - Independently, however, of the variety and change resulting from the plants cultivated, every month throughout the year has its particular operations and its products : nay, it would not be too much to say, that during six months of the year a change takes place, and is perceptible, in the plants of a garden, every day ; and every day has, in consequence, its operations and its products.
Page 109 - Grafting is the joining of a cutting of one to another tree in such a way as that the tree, on which the cutting is placed, sends up its sap into the cutting, and makes it grow and become a tree. When a cutting is thus applied it is called a scion. Certain stocks have been found to be suited to certain scions, but these will be particularly mentioned hereafter in the articles treating of the respective kinds of fruit. It is best that I confine myself...
Page i - DESCRIPTIONS OF THOSE PLANTS AND TREES MOST WORTHY OF CULTURE IN EACH DEPARTMENT. WITH ADDITIONS AND AMENDMENTS, ADAPTED TO THE CLIMATE OF THE UNITED STATES. In one small volume. Price only Twenty-five Cents. THE COMPLETE KITCHEN AND FRUIT GARDENER.
Page 83 - An uncommonly large, fair, handsome red apple — the form is round, flat at the ends : the skin is a lively red, streaked and spotted with a small portion of yellow : the stalk end frequently of a russet colour, both ends deeply indented ; the stalk very short, the taste is rich and pleasant, an admired table fruit, and excellent for cooking as well as for cider ; it ripens in October, and keeps well through the fall and winter. The tree is uncommonly large and handsome, the leaves small, it bears...
Page 64 - THE ORIENTAL PLANE (Platanus Orientalis) deserves to be planted in the United States as an ornamental tree. It grows to the height of from 70 to 90 feet, with widely spreading branches and a massive trunk, forming altogether a majestic object. The leaves are more deeply divided and indented than in our common species. A native of the East, where shady trees are not so abundant as in North America, it was celebrated in the earliest records of Grecian history. Xerxes, it seems, (according to Herodotus,)...
Page 14 - Places are not to be laid out with a view to their appearance in a picture, but to their uses, and the enjoyment of them in real life...
Page 81 - SUMMER ROSE. This is an apple of singular beauty and excellence, both for eating and stewing: the size is moderate, the form flat, the skin smooth, of a beautiful yellow resembling wax, blended with red in streaks and...

Bibliographic information