Should Psychology be a Science?: Pros and Cons

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1998 - Psychology - 249 pages
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The past century has seen many changes in the study of psychology. One of those major changes was the adoption of scientific principles to define and build the discipline of psychology. These principles were manifested in the discipline's method of investigation and subject matter. For many, this constituted a revolution in the study of psychology. This work examines the results of this revolution and asks whether it has been beneficial.

The author explains how the psychology-science union came about and examines the positive and negative results. He then describes the major characteristics of science (empiricism, generalization, hypotheses, theories, and models, analysis, reductionism, and determinism), explaining how each principle was utilized in regard to psychology. Dr. Abra also includes information on psychology's most eminent authorities who have fundamentally influenced its directions.

 

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Contents

The Empirical Rule
1
The Dark Side of Empiricism
30
Generalization
51
Generalization Some Disclaimers
70
Determinism in Science
98
Psychological Determinism Problems and Alternatives
120
Analysis and Reductionism
153
Conceptual Devices
179
Conclusion and Epilogue
194
References
203
Name Index
229
Subject Index
235
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

JOCK ABRA is Professor of Psychology at the University of Calgary.

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