Philosophical Essays

Front Cover
Hackett Publishing, Jan 1, 1989 - Philosophy - 366 pages
12 Reviews

Although Leibniz's writing forms an enormous corpus, no single work stands as a canonical expression of his whole philosophy. In addition, the wide range of Leibniz's work--letters, published papers, and fragments on a variety of philosophical, religious, mathematical, and scientific questions over a fifty-year period--heightens the challenge of preparing an edition of his writings in English translation from the French and Latin.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
2
4 stars
4
3 stars
6
2 stars
0
1 star
0

Review: Philosophical Essays

User Review  - Vova Ivlev - Goodreads

No matter how backwards and unnecessary his theories are, Leibniz's philosophy are revolutionary for his time. When everybody thought about the man in the sky, he though about the universal foundations named monads that made the world (also being controlled by the man in the sky) Read full review

Review: Philosophical Essays

User Review  - Goodreads

No matter how backwards and unnecessary his theories are, Leibniz's philosophy are revolutionary for his time. When everybody thought about the man in the sky, he though about the universal foundations named monads that made the world (also being controlled by the man in the sky) Read full review

Contents

Basic Works 1 Letter to Foucher 1675
1
Preface to a Universal Characteristic 167879
5
Samples of the Numerical Characteristic 1679
10
On Freedom and Possibility 168082?
19
Meditations on Knowledge Truth and Ideas 1684
23
On Contingency 1686?
28
Primary Truths 1686?
30
Discourse on Metaphysics 1686
35
On Nature Itself 1698
155
From the Letters to Johann Bernoulli 169899
167
From the Letters to de Voider 16991706
171
To Queen Sophie Charlotte of Prussia On What Is Independent of Sense and Matter 1702
186
Letter to Coste On Human Freedom 1707
193
Response to Father Tournemine on Harmony 1708
196
From the Letters to Des Bosses 171216
197
Principles of Nature and Grace Based on Reason 1714
206

From the Letters to Arnauld 168687 69
87
On Copernicanism and the Relativity of Motion 1689
90
On Freedom 1689?
94
The Source of Contingent Truths 168589?
98
Notes on Some Comments by Michel Angelo Fardella 1690
101
Preface to the Dynamics 1691?
105
Dialogue on Human Freedom and the Origin of Evil 1695
111
A Specimen of Dynamics 1695
117
New System of Nature 1695
138
Note on Fouchers Objection 1695
145
Postscript of a Letter to Basnage de Beauval 1696
147
On the Ultimate Origination of Things 1697
149
The Principles of Philosophy or the Monadology 1714
213
Letter to Samuel Masson on Body 1716
225
Contents
226
From the Letters to Wolff 171415
230
Leibniz on His Contemporaries
235
B Hobbes and Spinoza
268
Locke
284
From a Letter to Lady Masham on Thinking
290
Berkeley
306
Appendixes
347
Index
358
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1989)

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, one of the last real polymaths, was born in Leipzig. Educated there and at the Universities at Jena and Altdorf, he then served as a diplomat for the Elector of Mainz and was sent to Paris, where he lived for a few years and came into contact with leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians. During a trip to England, he was elected to the Royal Society; he made a visit to Holland to meet Spinoza. Back in Germany he became librarian to the Duke of Brunswick, whose library was the largest in Europe outside the Vatican. From there he became involved in government affairs in Hanover and later settled in Berlin at the court of Queen Sophie Charlotte of Prussia. Leibniz was involved in the diplomatic negotiations that led to the Hanoverian succession to the English throne. From his university days he showed an interest in mathematics, logic, physics, law, linguistics, and history, as well as theology and practical political affairs. He discovered calculus independently of Newton and had a protracted squabble about which of them should be given credit for the achievement. The developer of much of what is now modern logic, he discovered some important physical laws and offered a physical theory that is close to some twentieth-century conceptions. Leibniz was interested in developing a universal language and tried to master the elements of all languages. Leibniz corresponded widely with scholars all over Europe and with some Jesuit missionaries in China. His philosophy was largely worked out in answer to those of other thinkers, such as Locke, Malebranche, Bayle, and Arnauld. Although he published comparatively little during his lifetime, Leibniz left an enormous mass of unpublished papers, drafts of works, and notes on topics of interest. His library, which has been preserved, contains annotations, analyses, and often refutations of works he read. The project of publishing all of his writings, undertaken in the 1920s by the Prussian Academy, was delayed by World War II but was resumed thereafter. It is not likely that the project will be completed in the twentieth century.

Roger Ariew is Professor of Philosophy, University of South Florida.

Bibliographic information