The Wisconsin Frontier

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Indiana University Press, Aug 22, 1998 - History - 360 pages
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From 17th-century French coureurs de bois to lumberjacks of the 19th century, Wisconsin’s frontier era saw thousands arriving from Europe and other areas seeking wealth and opportunity. Indians mixed with these newcomers, sometimes helping and sometimes challenging them, often benefiting from their guns and other trade items. This captivating history reveals the conflicts, the defeats, the victories, and the way the future looked to Wisconsin’s peoples at the beginning of the 20th century.

 

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Contents

1 THE FRENCH OPEN A FRONTIER
1
2 BEFORE THE EUROPEANS
18
3 FRENCHMEN AND INDIANS
38
4 AN ARENA FOR INTERNATIONAL COMPETITION
66
5 STRUGGLE OVER THE UPPER LAKES
97
6 MINERS INDIAN WARS AND A FRONTIER TRANSFORMED
127
7 RUSH TO THE LAND
157
8 AN ETHNIC AND RELIGIOUS JUMBLE
185
9 RESTRICTING THE INDIAN DOMAIN
215
10 LOGGING THE PINERIES
246
11 LEGACIES
279
Essay on Sources
299
Index
327
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About the author (1998)

Mark Wyman is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of History at Illinois State University. He is author of several books, including Round-Trip to America: The Immigrants Return to Europe, 1880–1930 and Hoboes: Bindlestiffs, Fruit Tramps, and the Harvesting of the West.

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