Hapgood

Front Cover
Faber & Faber, 1988 - Performing Arts - 89 pages
2 Reviews
With his characteristically brilliant wordplay and extraordinary scope, Tom Stoppard has in "Hapgood "devised a play that "spins an end-of-the-cold-war tale of intrigue and betrayal, interspersed with explanations of the quixotic behavior of the electron and the puzzling properties of light" (David Richards, "The New York Times")," "It falls to Hapgood, an extraordinary British intelligence officer, to try to unravel the mystery of who is passing along top-secret scientific discoveries to the Soviets, but as she does so, the web of personal and professional betrayals--doubles and triples and possibly quadruples--continues to multiply.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Devil_llama - LibraryThing

One of the most convoluted Stoppard works I've ever read - and that's setting a high bar, since Stoppard is noted for his convoluted plots. This one involves agents and double agents, with twins ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - quantum_flapdoodle - LibraryThing

One of the most convoluted Stoppard works I've ever read - and that's setting a high bar, since Stoppard is noted for his convoluted plots. This one involves agents and double agents, with twins ... Read full review

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About the author (1988)

Tom Stoppard's other work includes Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Tony Award), Jumpers, Travesties (Tony Award), Night and Day, After Margritte, The Real Thing (Tony Award), Enter a Free Man, Hapgood, Arcadia (Evening Standard Award, The Oliver Award and the Critics Award), Dalliance and Undiscovered Country, Indian Ink (a stage adaptation of his own play, In the Native State) and The Invention of Love.
His radio plays include The Dissolution of Dominic Boot, 'M' is for Moon Among Other Things, If You're Glad I'll Be Frank, Albert's Bridge (Italia Prize), Where Are They Now?, Artist Descending A Staircase, The Dog It Was That Died and In the Native State (Sony Award).
His work for television includes Professional Foul (Bafta Award, Broadcasting Press Guild Award). His film credits include Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead which he also directed (winner of the Golden Lion, Venice Film Festival).

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