The New World in Early Modern Italy, 1492-1750

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Elizabeth Horodowich, Lia Markey
Cambridge University Press, Nov 16, 2017 - History - 360 pages
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Italians became fascinated by the New World in the early modern period. While Atlantic World scholarship has traditionally tended to focus on the acts of conquest and the politics of colonialism, these essays consider the reception of ideas, images and goods from the Americas in the non-colonial states of Italy. Italians began to venerate images of the Peruvian Virgin of Copacabana, plant tomatoes, potatoes, and maize, and publish costume books showcasing the clothing of the kings and queens of Florida, revealing the powerful hold that the Americas had on the Italian imagination. By considering a variety of cases illuminating the presence of the Americas in Italy, this volume demonstrates how early modern Italian culture developed as much from multicultural contact - with Mexico, Peru, Brazil, and the Caribbean - as it did from the rediscovery of classical antiquity.
 

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Contents

ITALY AND THE NEW WORLD
19
DANTE AND THE NEW WORLD
34
VENETIAN DIPLOMACY SPANISH GOLD AND
47
THREE BOLOGNESE FRANCISCAN MISSIONARIES
63
MISSIONARY GIFT RECORDS OF MEXICAN OBJECTS
86
FEDERICO BORROMEO AND THE NEW WORLD
103
THE VIRGIN OF COPACABANA IN EARLY MODERN
118
JESUIT MARTYRDOM IMAGERY BETWEEN MEXICO
143
SOUTHERN ITALY AND THE NEW WORLD IN THE
169
ALDROVANDIS NEW WORLD NATIVES IN BOLOGNA
225
CESARE VECELLIOS FLORIDIANS IN THE VENETIAN
248
BAROQUE ITALIAN EPIC FROM GRANADA TO
270
THE CONQUEST OF MEXICO
288
Select Bibliography
309
Index
336
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About the author (2017)

Elizabeth Horodowich is Professor of History at New Mexico State University. She is the author of Language and Statecraft in Early Modern Venice (Cambridge, 2008), and A Brief History of Venice (2009), and is the recipient of awards and fellowships from a variety of institutions, including the Harvard University Center, Villa I Tatti, Florence, The American Historical Association, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Lia Markey is the Director of the Center for Renaissance Studies at the Newberry Library in Chicago. She published Imagining the Americas in Medici Florence (2016) and co-wrote the exhibition catalogue, Italian Master Drawings from the Princeton University Art Museum (2014). She is the recipient of fellowships from the Kress and Mellon foundations, the Renaissance Society of America, the Folger Library, the Warburg Institute, Harvard's Villa I Tatti and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, she has taught at the University of Pennsylvania and Princeton University, New Jersey and worked at several museums.

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