Transactions of the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences

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Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1915 - Birds, Fossil - 109 pages
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Vol. 15, "To the University of Leipzig on the occasion of the five hundredth anniversary of its foundation, from Yale University and the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences, 1909."
  

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Page 13 - The great blue heron (Ardea herodias) is about 4 feet in length from the point of the bill to the end of the tail, and nearly 6 feet across the wings.
Page 291 - Neither doth their industry rest here, for they buy cotton wool in London, that comes first from Cyprus and Smyrna, and at home work the same and perfect it into fustians, vermillions, dimities, and other such stuffs, and then return it to London, where the same is vented and sold, and not seldom sent into foreign parts, who have means, at far easier terms, to provide themselves of the said first materials...
Page 348 - The towne of Manchester, in Lancashire, must be also ' herein remembered, and worthily for their encouragement ' commended, who buy the yarne of the Irish in great quantity, ' and, weaving it, returne the same again into Ireland to sell. ' Neither doth their industry rest here ; for they buy cotton ' wool in London that comes first from Cyprus and Smyrna, ' and at home worke the same, and perfect it into fustians...
Page 372 - Now, when they were brought into Cheap-side, there with great wonder they beheld the shops of the Goldsmiths...
Page 312 - ... ere the King could get roome to be gone: so that by his long stay, he began to be displeased, although the admiration of that sight did much qualifie his furie; but breaking out in discontent, by reason of his stay, he said, he thought Old Cole had got a Commission for all the carts in the country to cary his cloth.
Page 171 - ... or shall make any motion by word, letter, message or otherwise, to any person or persons, for the enhancing of the price or dearer selling of any thing...
Page 425 - ... exquisite, so swift, and so exact, that a merchant sitting at home in his counting-house at once converses with all parts of the known world. This, and travel, make a true-bred merchant the most intelligent man in the world, and consequently the most capable when urged by necessity to contrive new ways to live...
Page 180 - Huntington, in many of which places the Road, by reason of the great and many Loads which are weekly drawn in Waggons...
Page 171 - Whatsoever person or persons * * * shall engross or get into his or their hands by buying, contracting, or promise-taking, other than by demise, grant, or lease of land, or tithe, any corn growing in the fields, or any other corn or grain, butter, cheese, fish, or other dead...
Page 318 - In the year 1770, the land in our township was occupied by between fifty to sixty farmers; rents, to the best of my recollection, did not exceed 10s. per statute acre ; and out of these fifty or sixty farmers, there were only six or seven who raised their rents directly from the produce of their farms ; all the rest got their rent partly in some branch of trade, such as spinning and weaving woollen, linen, -or cotton. The cottagers were employed entirely in this manner, except for a few weeks in...

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