Rousseau, Robespierre and English Romanticism

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Cambridge University Press, Sep 26, 2005 - History - 304 pages
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This book reopens the question of Rousseau's influence on the French Revolution and on English Romanticism, by examining the relationship between his confessional writings and his political theory. Gregory Dart argues that by looking at the way in which Rousseau's writings were mediated by the speeches and actions of Robespierre, we can gain a clearer and more concrete sense of the legacy he left to English writers. He shows how the writings of Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Wordsworth and Hazlitt rehearse and reflect upon the Jacobin tradition in the aftermath of the Terror.
 

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Contents

Robespierre and the illusion
16
The politics of confession in Rousseau and Robespierre
43
Chivalry justice and the law in William Godwins Caleb
76
Rousseau Wollstonecraft
99
Malthus and the population
139
Wordsworth and
163
William Hazlitt and the resistance
209
Notes
247
Bibliography
268
Index
282
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