The Adirondack Black Spruce

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J.B. Lyon, printer, 1895 - Black spruce - 82 pages
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Page 8 - One of our leading text-books on botany states that " dark-mountain forests are often wholly composed of it." While this statement may possibly be true of other localities, there is certainly no such composition in the Adirondack forests, aside from the occasional but small clumps of spruce previously referred to. In some localities there are large areas along the mountain slopes covered with a heavy proportion of evergreens whose sombre hues might give rise to such an impression to a distant spectator,...
Page 53 - g have been cut from its trunk, the diameter of the last or top log at its small end will be from 10 to 12 inches, but the limbs above this point will be so thick and large that the fifth log would not be over five or six inches at the top, and would not be accepted by the lumbermen. A tree of the same species and size growing in a clump will yield five logs, because the shaft does not diminish in size so fast owing to the lighter growth of limbs that form its top. While the largest spruces are found...
Page 6 - ... distance of streams which will permit the floating or " driving " of logs to the mills. The value of the logs when delivered on the banks of these streams is about $1.30 per market, or $6.50 per 1,000 feet. The bark has no commercial value. It is peeled from standing trees, occasionally by woodsmen, guides or sportsmen, who use it for covering the roof or sides of their shanties.
Page 62 - The te.nperature was unusually low as an average, and in 1812, 1815 and 1816, at least, frosts or snows or both occurred in the summer. In 1815 and 1816 crops through the State were very seriously impaired, and many people despairing of the agricultural prospects of the country, emigrated to the Ohio valley. This severe weather then was without doubt the cause of the thin rings so regularly found in the spruce trees. Since that time this zone of rings...
Page 60 - The following are the words of Leonardo : — " The southern part of the plant shows more vigour and youth than the northern. The rings of the branches of trees show how many years they have lived, and their greater or smaller size whether they were damper or drier. They also show the direction in which they were turned, because they are larger on the north side...
Page 62 - Bureau, has been engaged in the Maine forests in counting tree rings with a view to establishing the age of the black spruce in that State, calls attention in his report to certain facts which throw some light on this matter of variable or retarded tree growth : " While carrying out the field work, which is behind all these statements, facts were found proving the influence of the weather on the growth of trees. In May, 1893, while at work on the Androscoggin river, word came from Mr. JA Pike, of...
Page 8 - The white spruce of the Adirondacks seems to be an inferior type of its kind. Prof. Charles S. Sargent, in his " Report on the Forests of North America...
Page 65 - ... of Saddle Rock Mountain, which had never before been cut. The soil was a deep red loam, and the spruce was gathered along brook runs or scattered amongst the hardwood growth intervening. But the point is that the timber was divided between two separate slopes of the mountain, the upper one of which was some 200 feet above the lower, and considerably more exposed. " The timber from each slope was yarded on the more level land at its base, and Mr. Monroe kept a separate scale of the two lots. A...
Page 60 - Vincif, who was an observant botanist as well as a great painter, wrote : " The rings of the branches of trees show how many years they have lived, and their greater or smaller size whether they were damper or drier. They also show the direction in which they were turned, because they are larger on the north side...
Page 19 - Length of ehaft, in feet. Diameter at top. in inches. Number of rings at top. Total height of tree, in feet.

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