The United States Speaker: A Copious Selection of Exercises in Elocution; Consisting of Prose, Poetry, and Dialogue: Drawn Chiefly from the Most Approved Writers of Great Britain and America

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S. Babcock, 1843
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Contents

Ginevra
30
Occasional Prologue
31
Occasional Epilogue
32
The Modern Rakes Progress
33
Eliza
36
Address to Sceptics
38
We are Seven
42
Not Strength enough in the Bow
44
Rutledge
53
Specimen of the Eloquence of James Otis
54
Worcester
83
Description of Junius
109
Love of Country Jfufo
122
Future Punishment Lament
123
Impossibility of Conquering America Chatham
124
Oratorical Action Fordyce
126
Appeal to the Jury in Defense of Rowan Curran
127
Men of Sterling Integrity only fit for Cilice Knoutles
128
Character of an Informer Cumin
129
Character of Filial Piety Sheridan
130
Defense of J A Williams for a Libel on the Clergy of Durham Brougham
131
Osmonds Dream Lewis
132
Reflections on the Youth and Theatrical Manner of Mr Pitt Walpole
134
Reply to the IllTimed Reflections of Mr Walpole Pitt
135
Benevolence of the Supreme Being Chalmers
136
Address to the Army of Italy Bonaparte
137
The Scriptures and the Savior Rousseau
138
Political Cupidity Reproved Sheridan
140
On the Competency of Parliament to Pass the Measure of Union Plunket
141
The Philosophy of Hatred Canning
142
Address to the Volunteers at Bristol Hall
144
The Splendor of War Chalmers
145
Political Severity Rebuked Byron
146
Effect of the Exclusive System on the Condition of Ireland Phillips
148
The Downfall of Bonaparte Grant
149
The Fame Awaiting a Reformation of the Law Brougham
151
Defense of Rowan for Libel Curran
152
Reply to Mr Corrys Attack on his Character Grattan
153
Reputation Phillips
155
Limitation of the Amount of Pensions Curran
156
Fallacy of Mr Tierneys Argument on a Motion for Peace with the French Canning
158
Indignant Rebuke on the Employment of Indians in Civilized Warfare Chatham
159
America __ Phillips
163
To the Jury in the Case of J A Williams for a Libel on the Clergy of Durham _ Brougham
165
Paines Age of Reason Erskine
166
The Horrors of War HaU
168
Invective against Warren Hastings Sheridan
170
Hyder All Burks
172
Speech of Mac Briar to the Scotch Insurgents Scott
173
SPECIMENS OF ANCIENT ELOQUENCE 1 Selection from Chapter xxxix of the Book of Job
175
The Song of Moses from Chapter xv of Exodus
176
Selection from the Book of Joel
177
32
229
Coutper
232
PATHETIC AND ENTERTAINING
271
10
279
14
285
Thompson
305
COMIC AND AMUSING
331
Anonymous
338
Taylor
358
Anonymous
359
Anonymous
361
Anonymous
364
Anonymous
365
Nurdis
366
PART THIRD DRAMATIC AND SENTIMENTAL 1 Tte Chamber of Sickness First Voice Second Voice Cotton
371
The Greek Orphan Paspati Epaininondas Cotton
372
The Churchyard First Voice Second Voice Karanuin
373
Stranger Child Hemans
374
Raimond Procida Hemans
376
Mordent Lenox Holcraft
378
Aiberto Theodore Anonymous
379
Athelwold Edwin Pilgrim Mason
381
Caswallon FitzEdward Walker
382
Verner Tell Pierre Theodore Sarnem Michael Soldiers and People Knowles
384
Druid Elidurus Arviragus Mason
387
Raimond Procida Hemans
389
Hakon Erling Anonymous
391
Essex Southampton Lieutenant of the Tower Raleigh Jones
393
Cams Gracchus Drusus Knowles
396
Rienzi Colonna Ursini Frangipani Cafarello Angelo Savelli the Nuncio Embassador Nobles Mitford
398
Vanoc Valens Anonymous
401
Gustavus Vasa Sivard Arnoldus Dalecarlians Brooke
404
Durazzo Garcia Perez Haynes
407
Penruddock Henry Cumberland
410
Catiline Aurolius Croly
413
Douglas Raby Moore
418
Verner Albert Tell Knowles
419
Prince Arthur TTubert Attendants Shaksprcire
422
King Edward Warwick Suffolk Franklin
426
2 aswallon Mador FitzEdward Walker
429
2 Bourbon Gonzales Kemhle
433
Col Walsingham Baron Hohendahl Alasco Shee
437
Saladin Malek Adhel Attendant Anonymous
442
sidore Ordonio Coleridge
447
Virginius Dentatus Icpius Appius Titus Scrvius Lucius Citizens Knowles
452
22 Procida Montalba Guido Sicilians Hemans
457
Scene Second
459
Ailing hem
470
Anonymous
480
Shakspeare
491
Anonymous
498

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Page 240 - tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, 'Give me some drink, Titinius,
Page 16 - It is in vain, sir, to extenuate the matter. Gentlemen may cry peace, peace, but there is no peace. The war is actually begun. The next gale that sweeps from the north will bring to our ears the clash of resounding arms. Our brethren are already in the field. Why stand we here idle ? What is it that gentlemen wish ? What would they have ? Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery ? Forbid it, Almighty God ! I know not what course others may take, but...
Page 176 - The enemy said, I will pursue, I will overtake, I will divide the spoil; my lust shall be satisfied upon them; I will draw my sword, my hand shall destroy them.
Page 178 - The LORD possessed me in the beginning of his way, Before his works of old. I was set up from everlasting, from the beginning, Or ever the earth was. When there were no depths, I was brought forth ; When there were no fountains abounding with water. Before the mountains were settled, Before the hills was I brought forth...
Page 266 - Echo still through all her song ; And where her sweetest theme she chose, A soft, responsive voice was heard at every close ; And Hope, enchanted, smiled, and waved her golden hair.
Page 309 - Last noon beheld them full of lusty life, Last eve in Beauty's circle proudly gay ; The midnight brought the signal-sound of strife, The morn the marshalling in arms, the day Battle's magnificently-stern array.
Page 268 - Bacchus' blessings are a treasure, Drinking is the soldier's pleasure : Rich the treasure, Sweet the pleasure, Sweet is pleasure after pain. Soothed with the sound the king grew vain; Fought all his battles o'er again, And thrice he routed all his foes, and thrice he slew the slain!
Page 220 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace there's nothing so becomes a man As modest stillness and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 179 - Then thou shalt see, and flow together, and thine heart shall fear, and be enlarged; because the abundance of the sea shall be converted unto thee, the forces of the gentiles shall come unto thee.
Page 270 - Now strike the golden lyre again: A louder yet, and yet a louder strain ! Break his bands of sleep asunder And rouse him like a rattling peal of thunder. Hark, hark ! the horrid sound Has raised up his head : As awaked from the dead, And amazed he stares around. Revenge, revenge...

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