The Economic Geography of Green County Wisconsin

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University of Wisconsin--Madison, 1922 - 88 pages
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Page 6 - IMPROVEMENT FOR MARSHALL AND DODGEVILLE SILT LOAMS. The areas of these soils, while differing somewhat in topography, are quite similar in chemical composition. Their analysis indicates between 1,300 and 1,400 pounds of phosphorus, 35,000 pounds of potassium, and 5,000 pounds of nitrogen in the surface 8 inches per acre. Their relatively large amount of nitrogen is due to the larger accumulation of organic matter which has taken place in these soils, due to their being in prairie rather than timber...
Page 5 - ... is thin, and the underlying residual material is often exposed in road cuts or on eroded slopes. To the west the covering becomes deeper, and along the west county line, it has a depth of over 20 feet. Native .vegetation, — This type embraces a portion, of the prairie region of Iowa County and has never supported a forest growth. The native vegetation consisted chiefly of prairie grasses, with only a very limited tree growth along the borders of the prairie and adjoining stream courses. Agricultural...
Page 8 - ... to small grains which occurred previous to the present decade have removed important quantities of that element. From now on it will be necessary for farmers on this type of soil to consider carefully the means of retaining and increasing the phosphorus content of their soils. The total potassium is sufficient to meet any demands, but its availability will depend upon the supply of actively decomposing organic matter; and the improvement of this type as a whole calls chiefly for the addition...
Page 10 - FINE SANDY LOAM, AND DUNESAND*. These types of soil have the chemical composition usually found in the sandy soils of Wisconsin. They have, on the average, approximately 1,000 pounds of phosphorus, 20,000 pounds of potassium, and from 1,000 to 2,000 pounds of nitrogen in the surface 8 inches of an acre. Their relatively small amount of organic matter, however, does not make even these quantities of the mineral elements, phosphorus and potassium, sufficiently available, so that methods of adding organic...
Page 29 - We have selected and bought what we believe to be a favorable point for settlement. The land lies eight miles from Exeter, and thiry-five miles from Mineral Point, where markets are held. It contains mostly fertile soil, good water in spring and streams, and sufficient forests. One of the streams running through our land has sufficient power for one or two mills, and we indulge in the pleasing hope that our fellow citizens who emigrate will if they are industrious and steady, find themselves in time...
Page 28 - G-larus. (2) in the course of 1844, tvro agents will be sent to visit the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois and Missouri for the purpose of selecting a tract of land large enough for the experiment.
Page 26 - Switzerland. Two narrow valleys, traversed by swift mountain torrents fed by snows and glaciers, divide the canton into two sections. At the head of the greater valley, GrossThai, is a high mountain pass leading into the ancient canton of Uri. At the head of the smaller valley, Klein-Thai, is a similar pass leading into the Grisons, and then on to upper Italy.
Page 26 - Judging from the situation of the canton and the names of localities, these valleys were originally peopled from both the north and south sides of the Alps. Undoubtedly, in the exterminating wars of ancient times, fugitives from religious and political proscription found a stern but safe asylum in the narrow, deep valleys, and on the steep mountain sides of Glarus. The southern element seems to have been strongest.
Page 41 - ... nights, are cool, and hence where corn growing is less important. 6. "Wisconsin leads in the making of Swiss cheese, chiefly carried on in the Swiss settlements in the southern part of the state. This cheese is more sensitive to soil and climatic conditions than any other kind; the Swiss factories are nearly all on land 900 to 1000 feet in altitude, and 95% of the 275 factories are on 52 limestone land, while 70% of the 106 factories making Limburger cheese are grouped in the low valleys on sandstone...
Page 22 - ... a dozen things which offered more returns for less energy. It seemed that something would of necessity happen before long or the very inertia of the system would carry the farmer to the foot of the ladder and all but compel him to start on a new career in a rational way — and something happened. The price of wheat rose from thirtyone cents to a dollar seventy cents between May, 1854, and the same month a year later. This remarkable rise in price is usually attributed to the Crimean War, and...

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