The beauties of the Isle of Wight

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Page 48 - Forgive, blest shade, the tributary tear, That mourns thy exit from a world like this ; Forgive the wish that would have kept thee here, And stayed thy progress to the seats of bliss • No more confined to grov'ling scenes of night, No more a tenant pent in mortal clay, Now should we rather hail thy glorious flight, And trace thy journey to the realms of day.
Page 53 - Elizabeth,) from this by a passage having on each side, an embattled wall, and under a very handsome machicolated gate, flanked with two round towers. The old door, with its wicket opening into the castle yard, is still remaining. It is formed of strong lattice work, having at each end a piece of iron, kept down by a strong nail.
Page 15 - All tenures being thus derived, or supposed to be derived, from the king, those that held immediately under him, in right of his crown and dignity, were called his tenants in capite...
Page 38 - ... and the warrant for his doing so was to be the continuance of a rude image in the wall of the house. Whether this be the legal tenure or not is another question ; one thing is certain — the idol is preserved in the wall, the farmer comes on the specific day for the crop, and the produce is carried to Newnham.
Page 53 - The entrance is on the west side, over a bridge, in a curtain, between two bastions ; then through a small gate, over which is the inscription before cited ; from this, by a passage, having on each side an embattled wall, and under a very handsome machicolated gate, flanked with two round towers. The old door, with its wicket, opening into the castle-yard, is still remaining ; it is formed of strong lattice work, having at each crossing a piece of iron, kept down by a large nail.
Page 37 - At the foot of St. John's wood are two meadows ; one on each hand, the main road running between them. These meadows are known by the name of Monk's Meads. It is a remarkable circumstance, that the first crop of hay they produce annually, is reaped not by the owner nor by the person who may rent the land, but by the tenant of Newnham farm ; a farm situated upwards of two miles distant, and which has no connexion whatever with the land.
Page 56 - Legion, who fell in the onslaught; and at a little distance, on the opposite side of the road, is a hollow way, where 4,000 men and a great number of horses were buried in one common grave.
Page 21 - It was laid out on a tract of waste barren ground, which in the course of a few years has become one of the most ornamental of the public promenades of this fine city.
Page 52 - National schools ; the other on the system of the British and Foreign School Society; the method of mutual instruction therefore prevailed.
Page 96 - Ditto, to carry a four-wheel carriage, with or without the family, without horses, (assistance and horse-boat...

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