Studies Scientific & Social: By Alfred Russel Wallace ..., Volume 2

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1900 - Science
 

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Page 455 - His watchmen are blind : they are all ignorant, they are all dumb dogs, they cannot bark ; sleeping, lying down, loving to slumber. Yea, they are greedy dogs which can never have enough, and they are shepherds that cannot understand : they all look to their own way, every one for his gain, from his quarter.
Page 453 - The land shall not be sold for ever; for the land is mine, for ye are strangers and sojourners with me.
Page 452 - Woe unto them that join house to house, that lay field to field, till there be no place, that they may be placed alone in the midst of the earth...
Page 454 - And again I say unto you, it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.
Page 540 - Nowhere amid the many descriptions of the tropics that have been given is to be found a summary of the past history and actual phenomena of the tropics which gives that which is distinctive of the phases of nature in them more clearly, shortly, and impressively.
Page 322 - Give a man the secure possession of a bleak rock, and he will turn it into a garden ; give him a nine years' lease of a garden, and he will convert it into a desert.
Page 435 - Therefore I must say that, as I hope for mercy, I can have no other notion of all the other governments that I see or know, than that they are a conspiracy of the rich, who on pretence of managing the public only pursue their private ends, and devise all the ways and arts they can find out; first, that they may, without danger, preserve all that they have so ill acquired, and then that they may engage the poor to toil and labor for them at as low rates as possible, and oppress them as much as they...
Page 528 - Plowmen, Shepherds, have I found, and more than once, and still could find, Sons of God, and kings of men in utter nobleness of mind...
Page 343 - has freedom to do all that he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other...
Page 342 - And as before so here, we see that, ethically considered, this law implies that each individual ought to receive the benefits and the evils of his own nature and consequent conduct : neither being prevented from having whatever good his actions normally bring to him, nor allowed to shoulder off on to other persons whatever ill is brought to him by his actions.

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