To Marry Medusa

Front Cover
Vintage Books, 1958 - Fiction - 154 pages
5 Reviews
"A master storyteller certain to fascinate."--Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Up until one minute ago, Gurlick was merely a specimen of Homo sapiens, and a substandard specimen at that. But now this craven, seething, barely literate drunk has ingested a spore that traveled light years before touching down on our planet. A spore that has in turn ingested Gurlick--turned him into a host for the Medusa, a hive mind so vast that it encompasses the life forms of a billion planets. A hive mind that is determined to ingest Earth as well.

In this mind-wrenching classic of science fiction, the Hugo and Nebula Award-winning novelist Theodore Sturgeon places humanity on a collision course with an organism of unimaginable power and malevolence and reminds us how much we depend on each other, or even on a wretch like Gurlick. Crackling with suspense, overflowing with invention, and startling in its compassion, To Marry Medusa is a tour de force from one of the great imaginers of the golden age of speculative fiction.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - AltheaAnn - LibraryThing

A short, but thoughtful - and unusual - story of alien invasion. The 'Medusa' is a hive mind which has taken over galaxies - and now one of its spores is here on Earth. However, the being it infects ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Darrol - LibraryThing

As short as this book is, it was a little hard for me to follow. A hive mind attacks humanity, but some force turns humanity into a different sort of hive mind that then absorbs the original? Read full review

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About the author (1958)

Theodore Sturgeon was born in Staten Island, New York, in 1918. He lived in New York City, upstate New York, and Los Angeles. In addition to More Than Human, winner of the International Fantasy Award, he is the author of Venus Plus X, To Marry Medusa, The Dreaming Jewels, and numerous other books and stories. He won the Hugo and Nebula Awards for his short story "Slow Sculpture" and the World Fantasy Life Achievement Award. He died in Eugene, Oregon, in 1985.

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