Loss of the American Brig Commerce: Wrecked on the Western Coast of Africa, in the Month of August, 1815. With an Account of Tombuctoo, and of the Hitherto Undiscovered Great City of Wassanah

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John Murray, 1817 - Africa, North - 618 pages
 

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Page 338 - Now there was no smith found throughout all the land of Israel, for the Philistines said, "Lest the Hebrews make them swords or spears." But all the Israelites went down to the Philistines, to sharpen every man his share and his coulter and his axe and his mattock.
Page 161 - Fire seldom, but fire sure. Push hard with the bayonet — the ball will lose its way, the bayonet never. The ball is a fool, the bayonet a hero ! Stab once, and off with the Turk from the bayonet.
Page 17 - The wind, as if by divine command, at this very moment ceased to blow. We hauled the boat out; the dreadful surges that were nearly bursting upon us, suddenly subsided, making a path for our boat about twenty yards wide, through which we rowed her out as smoothly as if she had been on a river in a calm, whilst on each side of us, and not more than ten yards distant, the surf continued to break twenty feet high, and with unabated fury. We had to row nearly a mile in this manner: all were fully convinced...
Page 599 - Tombuctoo, under an escort of about sixty armed men, having about eighteen camels and dromedaries. During the first ten days, they proceeded eastward at the rate of about fifteen to twenty miles a day, the prisoners and most of the Negroes walking, the officers riding, two upon each camel or dromedary. As the prisoners were all impressed with the belief that they were going to execution, several of the Moors attempted to escape; and in consequence, after a short consultation, fourteen were put to...
Page 613 - This is usually renewed every day: when neglected, the skin becomes rough, greyish, and extremely ugly. They usually sleep under cover at night, but sometimes, in the hottest weather, they will lie exposed to the night air, with little or no covering, notwithstanding that the fog, which rises from the river, descends like dew, and, in fact, at that season supplies the want of rain.
Page 32 - ... sensation. When I recovered, it was some time before I could recollect where I was : my intolerable thirst however at length convinced me, and I was enabled to administer the same wretched and disgusting relief to which I had so frequently before been compelled to resort. Despair now seized on me, and I resolved to cast myself into the sea as soon as I could reach it, and put an end to my life and miseries together.
Page xi - Palma, having a fair wind ; but it being very thick and foggy weather, though vPfe got two observations at noon, neither could be much depended upon. On account of the fog, we saw no land, and found, by good meridian altitudes on the twenty-eighth, that we were in the latitude of 27. 30. N. having differed our latitude by the force of current. one hundred and twenty miles ; thus passing the Canaries without seeing any of them. I concluded we must have passed through the intended passage without discovering...
Page 26 - I was enabled to loosen it by a few drops of my more than a dozen times distilled urine. Thus passed this day with us, and when night came on, it brought with it new distresses. We had advanced along the coast not more than about four miles this day, with all the exertion we were capable of, without finding any change for the better in our local situation, whilst our strength was continually diminishing, and no circumstance occurred to revive our hopes. We had seen this day, however, on the...
Page 613 - It is the universal practice of both sexes to grease themselves all over with butter produced from goat's milk, which makes the skin smooth, and gives it a shining appearance. This is usually renewed every day: when neglected, the skin becomes rough, greyish, and extremely ugly. They usually sleep under cover at night, but sometimes, in the hottest weather, they will lie exposed to the night air, with little or no covering, notwithstanding...
Page xv - ... but to take our lives also, or to seize upon our persons, and doom us to slavery, till death should rid us of our miseries. This was the first time I had ever suffered shipwreck. I had left a wife and five young children behind me, on whom I doated, and who depended on me entirely for their subsistence. My children would have no father's, and perhaps no mother's care, to direct them in the paths of virtue, to instruct their ripening years, or to watch over them, and administer the balm of comfort...

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