Publications, Volume 57

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Page 158 - ... in any sense, that is the existence of the Absolute One. I cannot here explain the reasons why, to my way of thinking, philosophy is forced to accept the metaphysical conception of the Absolute One, although, if this idea be realized in perfect sharpness, we are as unable to think as to deny that the Absolute One is either identical with, or different from, the world.1 I only state that the Absolute One in its very sense, as also, for instance, in the sense of...
Page 135 - Id; & & & •Jtjt detailed and elaborate, a research into it is a matter of difficulty. One will not be able to understand it unless one works hard. In order to make it easy to be understood by curtailing the elaborate composition, I again compiled an abridged treatise and called it ' Zfsien-Uung,' ' Exposition of the Doctrine
Page 161 - Nik., 82.) glitter of immutability, and liberated, on the other hand, from the last terrestrial feature it still possessed, viz., consciousness, the notion of the Absolute1; it was the Buddha who, for the first time, saw clearly that only ignorance can devise any relation at all between nature and the Supernatural One, and that a true ethic must therefore necessarily be atheistic ; it was the Buddha and no one else who made the doctrine of anatta a moral principle, and that not by denying the Absolute...
Page 157 - Miiller asked whether a religion which attains at last to the Nothing would not thereby cease to be a religion. To this it may easily be replied that Buddhism has never been regarded as a religion in the usual sense. It is, however, another thing if we put the question in this way : ' Is it possible that a thinker who had drunk out to the bottom the cup of knowledge — and we cannot help believing that the Buddha was such a thinker —could attain to the conviction that there was absolutely nothing...
Page 157 - ... times. But this is, of course, not an argument for everybody, and I would ask it to be considered only as a plus to what we shall find out in the further course of the argument. Without any doubt the question of Parinibbanam is, although not identical with, yet dependent on the question of the atta or substance, so that, if it were certain that the Buddha declined the idea of a substance in every sense, the answer concerning the Parinibbanam would of course be that it was annihilation in every...
Page 63 - Virtues, all selfabnegation and wisdom ; 467 attaining to the highest perfection, may I become Buddha incomparable, and having preached sweet doctrine, bringing happiness to man, 468 and freed all the world and the gods from the great bond of transmigration, may I reach the noble city of peace and bliss. 469-72 By King Vijayabahu, of Bhupala's royal line, the ornament of Ceylon, done in his own name. (?) The book was compiled by an Elder, wise, the abode of compassion, named Medhankara, well-behaved,...
Page 67 - Haimavanta' is in Chinese the ' snow -mountain school' (1| ll] #5). 3 Yasomitra, " Vibhasaya divyanti vaibhasika iti " ; cf. Professor de la Vallee Poussin, " Dogmatique Bouddhique," i, p. 65 (p. 297), note. Hiuentsang's statement that this commentary was drawn up in the Buddhist Council under Kaniska is very doubtful, because the book relates a miracle which it says occurred formerly in the reign of that king. See Watters, " On Yuan-Chwang,
Page 163 - With such premises much can be proved. One of Dr. Schrader's conclusions is that " it is beyond doubt that in Buddha's opinion there rests of the parinibbuto (one who has attained Nirvana) not the slightest shade of individuality ". It need hardly be said that this is only Dr. Schrader's " way of thinking ", but it does involve a question more than once touched upon by the commentators. Already in the Upanishads it was a problem whether the liberated atman...
Page 136 - I embellished and preserved his verses (Vasubandhu's Karika), and regarded them as the source of reference. " I cut short those extensive concluding arguments which are found in the ' Shun-li ' (Nyayanusara), and set forth the right expositions against his proofs (Vasubandhu's gastra) to illustrate the true excellent doctrines to which we adhere.
Page 162 - ham asmi, na m'eto atta, is applied by the Samkhya doctrine in almost exactly the same form, viz. : Ndsmi, na me, ndham, to exactly the same object, viz., the whole of material and spiritual things, but with the single aim of expressing the Purusa's not being prakrti or vikrti. Indeed, the end seems to be quite the same in both the systems: To reduce to a cause (pratyaya) every thing in nature, and thereby to prove that our real entity must not be looked for in, but beyond, the world. The only difference...

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