The Canon in Southeast Asian Literatures: Literatures of Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam

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Psychology Press, 2000 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 273 pages
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The literary canon is one of the most lively areas of debate in contemporary literary studies. This set of essays is both timely and original in its focus on the canon in South-East Asian literatures, covering Burma, Cambodia, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. They vary in focus, from the broad panoramic survey of trends in a national literature to very specific discussions of the role of individuals in shaping a canon or the place of a particular text within a tradition, and from contemporary to traditional literature. They include discussions of the development of prose fiction, censorship and artistic freedom, the role of westerners in codifying indigenous literatures, the writing of literary history, the development of literary criticism and indigenous aesthetics.

 

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Contents

Continuity and change in the Burmese literary canon
21
an overview of Vietnamese writing
41
configuring
58
Development in Malay criticism
76
J Kats and Javanese poetics
114
the case of Kambujasuriya
135
an analysis of Indonesian
147
Towards the canonizing of the Thai novel
172
Tajus Salatin The Crown of Sultans of Bukkhari alJauhari
183
convention and creativity in traditional
210
retrieving native poetics
234
Selected References
254
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About the author (2000)

David Smyth teaches Thai at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London.

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