The Italian cause: its history and its hopes

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Chapman and Hall, 1859 - Italy - 205 pages
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Page 101 - It is such violation of human and written law as this, carried on for the purpose of violating every other law, unwritten and eternal, human and divine; it is the wholesale persecution of virtue when united with intelligence, operating...
Page 101 - ... under the stimulants of fear and vengeance ; it is the perfect prostitution of the judicial office, which has made it, under veils only too threadbare and transparent, the degraded recipient of the vilest and clumsiest forgeries, got up wilfully and deliberately by the immediate advisers of the Crown for the purpose of destroying the peace, the freedom, aye, and even if not by capital sentences the life of men among the most virtuous, upright, intelligent, distinguished, and refined of the whole...
Page 170 - VI. The Town of Cracow, with its Territory, is declared to be for ever a Free, Independent, and strictly Neutral City, under the Protection of Austria, Russia, and Prussia.
Page 37 - Austrian notes, which have sometimes transgressed the limits of policy and decorum ; and the minor Princes of Italy are terrified by extravagant intimations of hostile designs entertained against them by the national party, headed by the Pope and the house of Savoy, in order to persuade them that their only safeguard is. the Austrian army. These intrigues may be thought necessary to the defence of the tottering power of Austria south of the Alps, for every step made in advance by Italy is a step...
Page 37 - There is not the least doubt that the Cabinet of Vienna is eager to grasp at the slightest pretext for an armed intervention south of the Po. If such a pretext do not occur, it is but too probable that it may be created; and any disturbances calculated to lead to such a result would at once betray their insidious origin. Meanwhile, the Pope is menaced in Austrian notes, which have sometimes...
Page 180 - Europe in arms, ready either to dis" bute our successes or to aggravate our reverses. " Nevertheless the difficulty of the enterprise would not have shaken " my resolution if the means had not been out of proportion to the " results to be expected. It was necessary to crush boldly the obstacles " opposed by neutral territories, and then to accept a conflict on the " Rhine as well as on the Adige.
Page 67 - Honourable mover or seconder, the ominous words " strict neutrality," as applied to this country, in the threatened contest. A state of declared neutrality on our part would be nothing less than a practical admission of those principles which we all loudly condemn, and a license to the commission of all the atrocities which we are unanimous in deprecating. I...
Page 181 - ... nor through abandoning the noble cause which I desired to serve, but for the interests of France. I felt great reluctance to put reins upon the ardour of our soldiers, to retrench from my programme the territory from the Mincio to the Adriatic, and to see vanish from honest hearts noble illusions and patriotic hopes. In order to serve the independence of Italy, I made war against the mind of Europe, and as soon as the destinies of my country appeared to be endangered, I concluded peace.
Page 181 - Italian peninsula understand, at last, the imperious necessity of salutary reforms. " Thus, after having given a new proof of the military power • of France, the peace which I...
Page 37 - The opposition of Austria has been constant and intense from the moment of his election. The spectacle of an Italian Prince, relying for the maintenance of his power on the affectionate regard and the national sympathies of his people — the resolution of the Pope to pursue a course of moderate reform, to encourage railroads, to emancipate the press, to admit laymen to offices in the State, and to purify the law, but, above all, the dignified independence of action manifested by the Court of Rome,...

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