Appleton's European Guide Book Illustrated ...

Front Cover
D. Appleton & Company, 1878 - Europe
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Cork to Dublin 89
39
Cork to Limerick
44
Dublin to Belfast 46
40
Belfast to Port Rush Londonderry and the Giants Causeway
48
Dublin to Kilkenny
53
Dublin to Galway
54
Dublin to Holyhead
55
SCOTLAND
56
Glasgow and the Clyde to Greenock 57
57
Glasgow to Carlisle
60
Glasgow to Carlisle by Dumfries
61
Glasgow to Ayr and the Land of Burns
65
Glasgow to Edinburgh by direct Railway
68
Glasgow to Oban
76
Oban to Staffa and Iona
77
Oban to Glencoe
79
Oban to Inverness
81
Edinburgh to Glasgow by Stirling
84
Edinburgh to Perth by Stirling
90
Perth to Inverness
91
Perth to Aberdeen
93
Perth to Dundee
96
Edinburgh to Melrose and Abbotsford
97
Edinburgh to BenvickonTweed
101
Edinburgh to Carlisle
102
ENGLAND
103
Route Page 32 Holyhead to London by Chester
104
Carlisle to Liverpool
106
SO Liverpool to Manchester
108
Liverpool to London
109
Southampton to London
137
London to Windsor and Stoke Pogis
144
5 London to Oxford StratfordonAvon Warwick and Kenilworth
148
London to York NewcastleonTyne and Berwickon Tweed
162
London to Trieste Brindisi Corfu Athens and Con
166
S7 London to Carlisle and Glasgow
169
London to Brindisi Corfu and Alexandria 715
172
Bristol to Chepstow and Gloucester
174
London to Salisbury Exeter Ilfracombe Plymouth and LandsEnd
178
London to Leicester Derby Leeds and Bradford
183
London to MatlockBath Chatsworth and Buxton
187
The Lake District
189
London to Cambridge Ely Norwich and Yarmouth
192
London to Harwich
195
London to Canterbury and Dover
196
London to Folkstone
199
London to Brighton and Newhaven
200
FRANCE
201
Route Page
203
Calais to Boulogne and Paris
205
Dieppe to Rouen and Paris
208
Havre to Rouen and Paris
209
Paris to Lyons Marseilles and Nice
291
Avignon to N imes vid the Pont du Gard
302
Nice to Mentone and Genoa by the Corniche Road
305
Paris to Orleans Bordeaux ana Bayonne
307
Bordeaux to Toulouse Montpellier and Marseilles
316
Brussels to Antwerp and Rotterdam
319
Brussels to Ghent Bruges and Ostend
325
Brussels to Liege AixlaChapelle and Cologne
329
Brussels to Namur Luxembourg Treves and Bale
331
SWITZERLAND
338
Bale to Schaffhausen and Constance
344
Schaffhausen to Zurich
349
Zurich to Coire the Spliigen Pass to Como and the En gadine
353
Zurich to Lucerne
355
The Ascent of the Rigi
356
The Lake of Lucerne Fliielen and the St Gothard Pass to Como and Logo Maggiore
358
Lucerne to Interlaken by the Brunig Pass
366
Interlaken to Lauterbrunnen and Grindelwald by the Wengern Alp
369
Grindelwald to Meyringen by the Great Scheideck
370
Meyringen to Hospenthal by the Grimsel Hospice and the Furca Pass
371
Genera to Lausanne and Vevay including the Lake of Geneva
372
Geneva to Milan by the Simplon Pass
377
Geneva to Chamouni
381
Martigny to Chamouni by the Tete Noire
385
Visp to Zennatt
387
Geneva to Bale by Freyburg and Berne
390
Geneva to Bale by Neuchatel
392
Berne to Thun and Interlaken
394
Thun to Leuk by the Gemmi Pass
395
GERMANY
404
Cologne to Hanover and Berlin S99 97 Cologne to Bremen
409
Cologne to Hamburg
410
Cologne to Leipsic and Dresden by Magdeburg
413
Berlin to Hamburg
424
Berlin to Dresden
425
Berlin to St Petersburgh by Kiinigsberg
429
The Rhine from Mayence to Cologne
431
ALGERIA
432
Mayence to FrankfortontheMain
448
Mayence to Darmstadt
449
FrankfortontheMain to Ems by Wiesbaden
451
FrankfortontheMain to Cassel
452
Frankfort to Homburg Baths
457
Frankfort to Munich by Stuttgard 438
470
Munich to Ratisbon
476
Vienna to Dresden by Prague
492
Prague to Niiremburg and Ratisbon by Pilsen
501
Vienna to Pesth by Railway and by the Danube
507
Arona to Milan
522
Milan to Venice
530
Milan to Florence and Brindisi
544

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 375 - It was on the day, or rather night, of the 27th of June 1787, between the hours of eleven and twelve, that I wrote the last lines of the last page, in a summer-house in my garden. After laying down my pen, I took several turns in a berceau, or covered walk of acacias, which commands a prospect of the country, the lake, and the mountains. The air was temperate, the sky was serene, the silver orb of the moon was reflected from the waters, and all nature was silent.
Page 375 - I will not dissemble the first emotions of joy on the recovery of my freedom, and perhaps the establishment of my fame. But my pride was soon humbled, and a sober melancholy was spread over my mind, by the idea that I had taken an everlasting leave of an old and agreeable companion, and that whatsoever might be the future date of my History, the life of the historian must be short and precarious.
Page 105 - Bedford, Berks, Bucks, Cambridge, Chester, Cornwall, Cumberland, Derby, Devon, Dorset, Durham, Essex, Gloucester, Hants, Hereford, Hertford, Huntingdon, Kent, Lancaster, Leicester, Lincoln, Middlesex, Monmouth, Norfolk, Northampton, Northumberland, Nottingham, Oxford, Rutland, Salop, Somerset, Stafford, Suffolk, Surrey, Sussex, Warwick, Westmoreland, Wilts, Worcester, and York.
Page 34 - The Manager personally undertakes the formation of Excursion Parties with a view to their comfort and economy. The Lakes afford excellent Salmon and Trout Fishing. BOATS, CARRIAGES, PONIBS, &c.
Page 148 - In the same pious confidence, beside her friend and sister, here sleep the remains of Dorothy Gray, widow, the careful, tender mother of many children, one of whom alone had the misfortune to survive her.
Page 99 - Hole. The new name was the invention of the poet, who loved thus to connect himself with the days when Melrose abbots passed over the fords of the Tweed. On this spot, a sloping bank overhanging the river, with the Selkirk hills behind, he built at first a small villa, now the western wing of the castle.
Page 16 - I do solemnly swear (or affirm, as the case may be,) that I will support, protect, and defend the constitution and government of the United States against all enemies, whether domestic or foreign, and that I will bear true faith, allegiance and loyalty to the same, any ordinance, resolution, or law of any state convention or legislature to the contrary notwithstanding...
Page 17 - British subject." 4. Passports are granted between the hours of twelve and four, on the day following that on which the application for the Passport has been received at the Foreign Office. 5. Passports are granted to persons who are either known to the Secretary of State or recommended to him by some person who is known to him ; or upon the written application of any banking firm established in London or in any other part of the United Kingdom.
Page 66 - O YE whose cheek the tear of pity stains, Draw near with pious rev'rence, and attend! Here lie the loving husband's dear remains, The tender father, and the gen'rous friend. The pitying heart that felt for human woe, The dauntless heart that fear'd no human pride, The friend of man — to vice alone a foe ; For ' ev'n his failings lean'd to virtue's side.
Page 99 - My heart clings to the place I have created. There is scarce a tree on it that does not owe its being to me.

Bibliographic information