The Manufacture of Pianoforte Action: Its Rise and Development

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Kessinger Publishing, 1904 - Piano - 68 pages
 

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Page 13 - ... inch broad at the top. The tangent, when the key was put down, rose to the string and pressing it upward, set it in vibration. With a good touch the player could feel the elasticity of the string, and the more this was felt the better the instrument was considered to be. By the pressure of the tangent the string was divided into two unequal lengths, each of which would have vibrated, but the shorter was instantly damped by a narrow band of cloth interlaced with the strings, which also damped...
Page 13 - gebunden.1 In the clavichords last made there were two strings tÝ) each tangent and note, tuned in unison. An admired effect of the clavichord was a change of intonation, caused by a stronger pressure on the key, which displacing a little the point of contact of the tangent, tightened the vibrating part of the string and made the note very slightly sharper in pitch. Another special grace was that of repeating a note several times in succession without quitting the key, a dynamic...
Page 13 - The tangent, when the key was put down, rose to the string and pressing it upward, set it in vibration. With a good touch the player could feel the elasticity of the string, and the more this was felt the better the instrument was considered to be. By the pressure of the tangent the string was divided into two unequal lengths, each of which would have vibrated, but the shorter was instantly damped by a narrow band of cloth interlaced with the strings, which also damped the longer section directly...
Page 12 - The lower, or natural, keys were usually black, and the upper, or chromatic, white. In Italy and the Netherlands the practice was the reverse. The strings of finely drawn brass wire were stretched nearly in the direction of the length of the case, but with a bias toward the back. On the right of the player were inserted in the...
Page 12 - The keys were in front, and extended beneath the sound board to the back of the case, each being balanced upon a wire pin, and prevented from rattling against its neighbor by a small piece of whalebone projecting from the key and ITALIAN CLAVICHORD, 1537 (Crosby Brown Collection) sheathed in a groove behind.
Page 12 - CLAVICHORD. other ornamental device — often the initials of the maker's name. Nearly at the back of each key, in an upright position, was placed a small brass wedge or ' tangent ' (═) about an inch high and an eighth of an inch broad at the top (Fig. 3). The tangent, when the key was put down, rose to the string and pressing it upwards set it in vibration. With a good touch the player could feel the elasticity of the string, and the more this was felt the better the instrument...
Page 13 - ... tangent to fall. The tangents thus not only produced the tones but served as a second bridge to measure off the vibrating lengths required for the pitch of the notes. Thus a delicate tone was obtained that had something in it charmingly hesitating or tremulous; a tone although very weak, yet...
Page 9 - It i* usually made of pear-tree, rests on the back end of the key-lever, and has a moveable tongue of holly working on a centre, and kept in its place by a bristle spring. A thorn or spike of crowquill projects at right angles from the tongue. On the key being depressed the jack is forced upwards, and the quill is brought to the string, which it twangs in passing. The string is damped by the piece of cloth above the tongue. When the key returns to its level, the jack follows it and descends; and...
Page 18 - Flilgel, or wing-shaped Piano, had been the original form employed, the action of the Grand Piano was not known until about 1776. Its invention is attributed to a Dutchman, Americus Bachers. It is an improvement of Cristofori's first idea and was ultimately known as the "English action," as it was called on the Continent.
Page 13 - CLAVICHORD. the pitch of the notes. Thus a delicate tone was obtained that had something in it charmingly hesitating or tremulous ; a tone, although very weak, yet capable, unlike the harpsichord or spinet, of increase...

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