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Oneworld Classics, Jul 1, 2010 - Fiction - 761 pages
6 Reviews
A literary landmark in its groundbreaking approach, as well as a priceless document of its age

One of the most ambitious narratives of nineteenth-century realism, Middlemarch tells the story of an entire town in the years leading up to the Reform Bill of 1832, a time when modern methods were starting to challenge old orthodoxies. Eliot's sophisticated and acute characterization gives rich expression to every nuance of feeling, and vividly brings to life the town's inhabitants?including the young idealist Dorothea Brooke, the dry scholar Casaubon, the young, passionate reformist doctor Lydgate, the flighty young beauty Rosamond, and the old, secretive banker Bulstrode?as they move in counterpoint to each other. Art, religion, politics, society, science, human relationships in all their complexity?nothing is left unexamined under the narrator's microscope. Also included in this edition are pictures and an extensive section on George Eliot's life and works.

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Review: Middlemarch

User Review  - Siobhan - Goodreads

Best. Goddamned. Book. Ever. Seriously, this shit's bananas. BANANAS. 750 pages in, and you're still being surprised. It's 800 pages long and EVERY SINGLE PAGE ADVANCES THE PLOT. You cannot believe it ... Read full review

Review: Middlemarch

User Review  - Traveller - Goodreads

Since I've been told bigger is better, and long reviews are better than short ones, I've decided to update my short Middlemarch review with a long one: Although Eliot started working on the serialised ... Read full review

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About the author (2010)

GEORGE ELIOT was born in Nuneaton on November 22, 1819. Baptized Mary Anne Evans, Eliot chose to write using a male pen name. She was sent away to school but returned when her mother died in 1836. She later moved to Coventry with her father. After her father's death she became the Assistant Editor of the Westminster Review in 1851. She also met George Henry Lewes this year and they became partners for the rest of his life. Lewes was already married, although he and his wife both considered their relationship to be an open one, but he and Eliot set up home together, much to the dismay of polite London society. In 1857 Eliot published Amos Barton in Blackwood's Magazine and in 1859 her novel Adam Bede was published to great acclaim.

Her first attempt to write Middlemarch, her most famous novel, ended in failure. Abandoning it, she began a short novella entitled Miss Brooke which was eventually integrated into the final version of Middlemarch. The novel was published serially in eight parts in 1871. Lewes died in 1878 and Eliot married again in 1880. Her husband, John Walter Cross was an American who was twenty years her junior. George Eliot died on December 22, 1880 at 4 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea and is buried in Highgate Cemetery next to Lewes.

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