The Works of Richard Bentley, Volume 2

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F. Macpherson, 1836 - Poetry, Ancient
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Page 131 - I think he must have little skill in painting, that cannot find out this to be an original ; such diversity of passions, upon such variety of actions and passages of life and government, such freedom of thought, such boldness of expression, such bounty to his friends, such scorn of his enemies, such honour of learned men, such esteem of good, such knowledge of life, such contempt of death, with such fierceness of nature and cruelty of revenge, could never be represented but by him that possessed...
Page 131 - Phalaris to have more Race, more Spirit, more Force of Wit and Genius than any others I have ever seen, either Ancient or Modern.
Page 181 - Tis observable, that every one of the letters bear date after his banishment, and contain a complete narrative ol N 2 ISO ENGLISH GRAMMAR. (Rule SJ all his story afterwards ;" it oaghttobe "bears" and
Page 11 - Latin words which we have transplanted into our own soil ; which being now in a manner exhausted, one may easily presage that it will not have such changes in the two next centuries. Nay, it were no difficult contrivance, if the public had any regard to it, to make the English tongue immutable ; unless hereafter some foreign nation shall invade and over-run us.
Page 131 - Politian with some others have attributed them to Lucian : but I think he must have little skill in painting, that cannot find out this to be an original ; such diversity of passions upon such variety of actions and passages of life and government, such freedom of thought, such boldness of expression, such bounty to his friends, such scorn of his enemies...
Page 131 - Fables and Phalaris's Epistles, both living near the same time, which was that of Cyrus and Pythagoras. As the first has been agreed by all ages since for the greatest master in his kind, and all others of that sort have been but...
Page 82 - When you return to these again, you feel, by the emptiness and deadness of them, that you converse with some dreaming pedant with his elbow on his desk; not with an active, ambitious tyrant, with his hand on his sword, commanding a million of subjects.
Page 131 - ... expression, such bounty to his friends, such scorn of his enemies, such honour of learned men, such esteem of good, such knowledge of life, such contempt of death, with such fierceness of nature and cruelty of revenge, could never be represented but by him that possessed them; and I esteem Lucian to have been no more capable of writing than of acting what Phalaris did. In all one writ, you find the scholar or the sophist; and in all the other, the tyrant and the commander.
Page 169 - Near two thousand of his letters, a mode of composition in which Libanius was thought to excel, are still extant, and already published. The critics may praise their subtle and elegant brevity; yet Dr Bentley (Dissertation upon Phalaris, p.

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