Men of Mark: Eminent, Progressive and Rising, Pages 1-670

Front Cover
G. M. Rewell & Company, 1887 - African American men - 1138 pages
TO PRESUME to multiply books in this day of excellent writers and learned book-makers is a rash thing perhaps for a novice. It may even be a presumption that shall be met by the production itself being driven from the market by the keen, searching criticism of not only the reviewers, but less noted objectors. And yet there are books that meet a ready sale because they seem like "Ishmaelites"--against everybody and everybody against them. Whether this work shall ever accomplish the design of the author may not at all be determined by its sale. While I hope to secure some pecuniary gain that I may accompany it with a companion illustrating what our women have done, yet by no means do I send it forth with the sordid idea of gain. I would rather it would do some good than make a single dollar, and I echo the wish of "Abou Ben Adhem," in that sweet poem of that name, written by Leigh Hunt. The angel was writing at the table, in his vision. The names of those who love the Lord.Abou wanted to know if his was there--and the angel said "No." Said Abou, I pray thee, then, write me as one that loves his fellow-men. That is what I ask to be recorded of me. The angel wrote and vanished. The next night It came again, with a great awakening light. And showed the names whom love of God had blessed. And lo! Ben Adhem's name led all the rest. I desire that the book shall be a help to students, male and female, in the way of information concerning our great names. I have noticed in my long experience as a teacher, that many of my students were wofully ignorant of the work of our great colored men--even ignorant of their names. If they knew their names, it was some indefinable something they had done--just what, they could not tell. If in a slight degree I shall here furnish the data for that class of rising men and women, I shall feel much pleased. Herein will be found many who had severe trials in making their way through schools of different grades. It is a suitable book, it is hoped, to be put into the hands of intelligent, aspiring young people everywhere, that they might see the means and manners of men's elevation, and by this be led to undertake the task of going through high schools and colleges. If the persons herein mentioned could rise to the exalted stations which they have and do now hold, what is there to prevent any young man or woman from achieving greatness? Many, yea, nearly all these came from the loins of slave fathers, and were the babes of women in bondage, and themselves felt the leaden hand of slavery on their own bodies; but whether slaves or not, they suffered with their brethren because of color. That "sum of human villainies" did not crush out the life and manhood of the race. I wish the book to show to the world--to our oppressors and even our friends--that the Negro race is still alive, and must possess more intellectual vigor than any other section of the human family, or else how could they be crushed as slaves in all these years since 1620, and yet to-day stand side by side with the best blood in America, in white institutions, grappling with abstruse problems in Euclid and difficult classics, and master them? Was ever such a thing seen in another people? Whence these lawyers, doctors, authors, editors, divines, lecturers, linguists, scientists, college presidents and such, in one quarter of a century?
 

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This is a treasure trove of profiles of many forgotten black men of 19th century Washington, D.C.

Contents

PhilanthropistCoal DealerTwenty Years Owner of the largest
149
CHAPTER XI
162
CHAPTER XIII
180
A Minister of the Gospel Eminent for his Piety
185
SMITH
194
Distinguished Presbyterian DivineProfessor of Howard Univer
199
Rev NICHOLAS FRANKLIN ROBERTS A B A M
205
DENMARK VEAZIE
231
JOHN WESLEY TERRY
240
WILLIAM E Matthews LL
246
REV JAMES ALFRED DUNN PODD
252
REY THEODORE DOUGHTY MILLER D D
260
BALTIMORE
267
CHAPTER XXVIII
273
PROFESSOR JOHN H BURRUS A B A M
281
HENRY F WILLIAMS
288
REV EDMUND KELLY
291
CHAPTER XXXIV
302
John Mitchell
314
Pastor of a Church Incorporated by a State LegislatureAn
321
PROFESSOR RICHARD THEODORE GREENER A B LL B LL D
327
CAPTAIN PAUL CUFFEE Sea CaptainWealthy Ship OwnerPetitions to the Massachusetts
336
BENJAMIN BANNEKER
344
REV RICHARD DeBAPTISTE D D
352
HON George French Ecron
358
REV CHRISTOPHER H PAYNE
368
CHAPTER XLVI
384
CHAPTER XLVII
390
CHAPTER XLIX
403
CHAPTER L
410
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419
Principal State Normal School North Carolina
422
CHAPTER LIII
428
CHAPTER LV
436
CHAPTER LVII
447
CHAPTER LIX
454
Distinguished French NegroDramatist and NovelistVoluminous
457
CHAPTER LXII
466
CHAPTER LXIII
474
CHAPTER LXIV
481
CHAPTER LXVI
491
LawyerLegislatorPresident of the Tennessee Fair Association
498
Rev Lott Carey
506
Hon John MERCER LANGSTON A B A M LL D
511
Rev WILLIAM H MCALPINE
524
REV ALEXANDER CRUMMELL A B D D
530
Hon GEORGE H White
536
School Teacher in Slavery DaysMusicianMail AgentRevenue 545
545
PROF WILLIAM Eve HOLMES A B A M
567
CHAPTER LXXVIII
579
Rev HENRY N JETER
588
The last Colored State Senator in the Mississippi Legislature
594
CHAPTER LXXXIV
603

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Page 1028 - Now the Lord had said unto Abram, Get thee out of thy country, and from thy kindred, and from thy father's house, unto a land that I will shew thee : and I will make of thee a great nation, and I will bless thee, and make thy name great ; and thou shalt be a blessing: and I will bless them that bless thee, and curse him that curseth thee : and in thee shall all families of the earth be blessed.
Page 148 - Then shall the righteous answer him, saying, Lord, when saw we thee an hungered, and fed thee? or thirsty, and gave thee drink ? When saw we thee a stranger, and took thee in ? or naked, and clothed thee ? or when saw we thee sick, or in prison, and came unto thee?
Page 148 - Then shall the King say unto them on his right hand, 'Come, ye blessed of my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world: for I was an hungred and ye gave me meat, I was thirsty and ye gave me drink, I was a stranger and ye took me in; naked and ye clothed me, I was sick and ye visited me, I was in prison and ye came unto me.
Page 176 - A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach; not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous; one that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity...
Page 882 - And all that believed were together, and had all things common ; and sold their possessions and goods, and parted them to all men, as every man had need.
Page 315 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 1028 - And he said unto Abram, Know of a surety that thy seed shall be a stranger in a land that is not theirs, and shall serve them; and they shall afflict them four hundred years; and also that nation, whom they shall serve, will I judge: and afterward shall they come out with great substance.
Page 1029 - Then spake Joshua to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the children of Israel, and he said in the sight of Israel, Sun, stand thou still upon Gibeon, and thou Moon in the valley of Ajalon.
Page 1030 - And after these things I saw four angels standing on the four corners of the earth, holding the four winds of the earth, that the wind should not blow on the earth, nor on the sea, nor on any tree.

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