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User Review  - JohnPhelan - LibraryThing

An interesting and well ordered look at the causes and consequences of the financial crisis from a mainstream but non New Keynesian approach. Its focus on the role of government agencies in the fostering of the housing boom alone makes it worthwhile. Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - nosajeel - LibraryThing

Raghuram Rajan is the hands down co-winner of the best title for any economics book in recent years: Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists. It was also a very good book. Relative to this stellar ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - GloriaMundi - LibraryThing

Raghuram Rajan’s Fault Lines is the best book on the financial crisis that I have read thus far. Here’s why. First, Rajan does not claim that there was a single causa causans. There wasn’t – it was a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jasonlf - LibraryThing

Raghuram Rajan is the hands down co-winner of the best title for any economics book in recent years: Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists. It was also a very good book. Relative to this stellar ... Read full review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I really liked this book.
It was mostly analysis, not lots of facts. Some of his conclusions I thought were lacking in evidence.
It explained a lot of things to me, though, that I never knew. It
explains how, exactly, the Chinese government keeps its currency's exchange rate fixed. It explains why it was somewhat plausible for a security made up only of subprime mortgages to be rated AAA. But mostly it explains why the world economy is so unstable, and makes serious suggestions for improvement.
Definitely worth a read for anyone with an interest in or patience for macro economics.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

I had been wanting to read this book for many months since it had been billed as the Goldman Sachs/Financial Times 2010 business book of the year.
Unfortunately, this book was hard to read
, stylistically simple and lacked any truly captivating narrative. It was like reading a power point presentation. Although the ideas put forth were sometimes interesting I found the prose to be uninspiring.
Also, it seemed that the author was biting off more than he could chew. Each chapter covered a rather large issue over the course of about 20 pages, not nearly enough to craft a thorough argument.
There was one very interesting section called The Cost of Undervaluation, very near the end of the book, about the relationship of the renminbi to the dollar and the various repercussions of that policy. The section gave me new insight into this topic. Yet, again, it could have just as easily been put in bullet point format and been as interesting.
 

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

One can't argue with Raghuram Rajan on any aspect of the 'fault-lines' defined by him as responsible for the present economic crisis. At all times, he keeps the bigger picture in mind without getting stuck by bias or prejudice especially against the investment banking thieves - Pradeep Kabra

Review: Fault Lines: How Hidden Fractures Still Threaten the World Economy

User Review  - Bryan - Goodreads

The book starts out strong with an innovative, insightful analysis of what caused the current financial crisis and what risks remain for the global economy. Rajan's "solutions," however, lack detail and are too academic. Read full review


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