The Practice of Medical Electricity: Showing the Most Approved Apparatus, Their Methods of Use, and Rules for the Treatment of Nervous Diseases, More Especially Paralysis and Neuralgia

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Page 90 - In man, whatever may be the direction of the currents, or the degree of vitality of the nerves they traverse, the same results are always produced when the conductors are applied to any portion over the course of the nerves — namely, muscular contractions and sensations.
Page 26 - ... but the possession of this capability in a greater or smaller degree in different bodies, makes them better or worse conductors, worse or better insulators; and both induction and conduction appear to be the same in their principle and action (1320.), except that in the latter an effect common to both is raised to the highest degree, whereas in the former it occurs in the best cases, in only an almost insensible quantity.
Page 17 - One piece to be put at the bottom of the containing jar, and two other pieces resting on this to form the two vertical sides. This is less expensive to make, and more economical in use. A binding screw attached to the zinc plate, and one to the platinum, form the two electrodes. Two different exciting fluids are required for this...
Page 60 - Paris an account of some experiments made upon horses which were previously made insensible to pain. He found that the electric positive sign, indicating the direction of the current, was constantly from the red, or arterial, to the black, or venous, blood. He concludes his memoir by saying that since it is demonstrated that the red blood and the black blood, in their contact through the walls of the vessels, which act as true porous vases, give stated electric reactions to the galvanometer, we must...
Page 31 - ... its size it would ignite no greater length ; but two, three, or more cells were shown to ignite two and three times the original length, the quantity passing in the greater length being under the higher tension, precisely the same as in the original length. This explained Faraday's oft misunderstood remark, that the same quantity of electricity which would ignite an inch of wire, would ignite a foot or a mile. The pain and shock experienced on touching a powerful battery, or shocking coil, or...
Page 50 - As a means of diagnosis between actual paralysis of sensation and mere subjective anaesthesia, in which the tactile powers are unaltered. 3. As a means of determining the progress of a given case of paralysis for better or for worse.
Page 16 - The zinc plate is usually made out of a long strip bent up in the form of the letter U, by which means the zinc is brought opposite to each side of the platinum plate. But it is more advantageous, instead of bending a long slip of zinc, to employ three shorter pieces. One piece to be put at...
Page 29 - Cases of the independent variation of tension and quantity were shown, and it was pointed out that all the most striking properties of electricity, such as the decomposition of water and salts, the combustion of metals the deflection of the galvanometer, the attraction of the electro-magnet, and the physiological effects of the current were really dependent as regards their magnitude and energy, solely on the quantity of electricity passing. Their greater energy when the tension was increased, was...
Page 60 - ... in their contact through the walls of the vessels, which act as true porous vases, give stated electric reactions to the galvanometer, we must admit, that as all the parts of our body are traversed by sanguineous fluids, there must necessarily be a constant disengagement of electricity in the most relaxed tissues of our bodies. Thus each organic molecule is incessantly stimulated by the electric fluid, and thus under the influence of this excitement, all the functions of the body are performed....
Page 60 - Scoutetten has reported to the Academy of Sciences at Paris an account of some experiments made upon horses which were previously made insensible to pain. He found that the electric positive sign, indicating the direction of the current, was constantly from the red, or arterial, to the black, or venous, blood. He concludes his memoir by saying that since it is demonstrated that the red blood and the black blood, in their contact through the walls of the vessels, which act as true porous vases, give...

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