The Golden Notebook

Front Cover
HarperPerennial, 1994 - Diary fiction - 623 pages
30 Reviews
Lessing's powerful and liberating feminist classic--now available in a beautiful trade paperback edition. Alternating between a conventional novel, involving Anna and her friend Molly, and Anna's journal entries, the notebooks reflect various aspects of Anna's personal and political upheavals.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

User ratings

5 stars
8
4 stars
6
3 stars
6
2 stars
10
1 star
0

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - jwood652 - LibraryThing

This book explores the Communist Party, relationships, treatment of women in society and mental illness. Although there are amazing insights into membership in the Communist Party in the'50s and the ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - baswood - LibraryThing

The Golden Notebook - Doris Lessing This novel was not a trumpet for Women’s Liberation; claimed Lessing herself in an essay written in 1971, nearly ten years after The Golden Notebook was published ... Read full review

All 9 reviews »

Contents

A nna meets her friend Molly in the summer of1957
3
THE NOTEBOOKS
52
Two visits some telephone calls and a tragedy
241
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1994)

Doris Lessing was born in Kermanshah, Persia (later Iran) on October 22, 1919 and grew up in Rhodesia (the present-day Zimbabwe). During her two marriages, she submitted short fiction and poetry for publication. After moving to London in 1949, she published her first novel, The Grass Is Singing, in 1950. She is best known for her 1954 Somerset Maugham Award-winning experimental novel The Golden Notebook. Her other works include This Was the Old Chief's Country, the Children of Violence series, the Canopus in Argos - Archives series, and Alfred and Emily. She has received numerous awards for her work including the 2001 Prince of Asturias Prize in Literature, the David Cohen British Literature Prize, and the 2007 Nobel Prize for Literature. She died on November 17, 2013 at the age of 94.

Bibliographic information