The history of England: from the Revolution to the death of George the Second. (Designed as a continuation of Mr. Hume's history.)

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Levis & Weaver, 1810 - Great Britain
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Page 320 - Rome, the Seat of such Person shall immediately become void ; and if any such Person shall, in any of the Cases aforesaid, presume to sit or vote as a Member of the House of Commons...
Page 442 - The exhibitions of the stage were improved to the most exquisite entertainment by the talents and management of Garrick, who greatly surpassed all his predecessors of this and perhaps every other nation, in his genius for acting ; in the sweetness and variety of his tones, the irresistible magic of his eye, the fire and vivacity of his action, the elegance of attitude, and the whole pathos of expression.
Page 182 - Ireland to exert their well known zeal and spirit in support of his majesty's government, and in defence of all that was dear to them, by timely preparation to resist and frustrate any attempts of the enemy to disturb the quiet and shake the security of this kingdom : he, therefore, in the strongest manner, recommended it to them to manifest, upon this occasion, that zeal for the present happy establishment, and that affection for his majesty's person and government, by which the parliament of that...
Page 443 - The genius of Cervantes was transfused into the novels of Fielding, who painted the characters, and ridiculed the follies of life, with equal strength, humour, and propriety. The field of history and biography was cultivated by many writers of ability ; among whom we distinguish the copious Guthrie, the circumstantial Ralph, the laborious Carte, the learned and elegant Robertson, and above all, the ingenious, penetrating and comprehensive Hume, whom we rank among the first writers of the age, both...
Page 178 - French, and bore down upon their van, leaving the rear to those that came after. Sir Edward Hawke, in the Royal George, of one hundred and ten guns, reserved his fire in passing through the rear of the enemy, and ordered his master to bring him alongside of the French admiral, who commanded in person on board the Soleil Royal, a ship mounted with eighty cannon, and provided with a complement of twelve hundred men. When the pilot remonstrated that he could not obey his command without the most imminent...
Page 326 - A committee having been appointed to inquire into the original standards of weights and measures in the kingdom of England, to consider the laws relating thereto, and to report their observations thereupon, together with their opinion of the most effectual means for ascertaining and enforcing uniform and certain standards of weights and measures, they prepared...
Page 263 - To the extraordinary prowess of those gallant brigades, and the fire of the British artillery, which was admirably served by the captains Philips, Macbean, Drummond, and Foy, the victory was in a great measure ascribed. The same night the enemy passed the Weser, and burned the bridges over that river. Next day the garrison of Minden surrendered at discretion ; and here the victors found a great number of French officers wounded.
Page 261 - ... began with great vivacity ; and the action became very hot towards the right, where six regiments of English infantry, and two battalions of Hanoverian guards, not only bore the whole brunt of the French carabineers and gendarmerie, but absolutely broke every body of horse and foot that advanced to attack them on the left and in the centre.
Page 445 - ... remained exposed to all the storms of indigence, and all the stings of mortification. While the queen lived, some countenance was given to learning. She conversed with Newton, and corresponded with Leibnitz. She took pains to acquire- popularity ; the royal family on certain days dined in public, for the satisfaction of the people : the court was animated with a freedom of spirit and vivacity, which rendered it at once brilliant and agreeable. At her death that spirit began to languish, and a...
Page 344 - Fired with these suppositions, he first expressed his resentment, by giving Johnson notice to quit the farm which he possessed on the estate ; but finding the trustees had confirmed the lease, he determined to gratify his revenge by assassination, and laid his plan. accordingly. On Sunday the thirteenth of January he appointed this unhappy man to come to his house on the Friday following, in order to peruse papers, or settle accounts ; and Johnson went thither without the least suspicion of what...

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