Bright Star

Front Cover
Berkley Books, 1999 - Fiction - 287 pages
0 Reviews
Five years and several billion dollars in the making, Bright Star is a top-secret Defense Department satellite that not only pinpoints enemy ships, tanks, planes, artillery, and missiles but also simultaneously 'paints' up to a thousand targets, coordinating a multiple-beam high-energy laser attack to enemy forces from the battlefield within minutes. The nation possessing Bright Star will have an impenetrable nuclear umbrella as well as an overwhelming tactical advantage on the battlefield for years to come. When the space shuttle - with Bright Star aboard - mysteriously crashes near the coast of Maine, ex-Navy SEAL Philip Drake is called in to retrieve the satellite before it falls into the hands of the highest bidder in the covert arms market. With high tension and riveting, state-of-the-art action above and beneath the sea, Bright Star fulfills the promise of Stevenson's debut.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

BRIGHT STAR

User Review  - Jane Doe - Kirkus

Deep-sea thrills enliven this sequel to Stevenson's well-received debut, Torchlight (1997). Stevenson III, a relative both of his namesake and also of Hart Crane, has done much treasure-diving off New ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
17
Section 3
27
Copyright

21 other sections not shown

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (1999)

Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894) was born in Edinburgh. In the brief span of forty-four years, dogged by poor health, he made an enormous contribution to English literature with his novels, poetry, and essays. The son of upper-middle-class parents, he was the victim of lung trouble from birth, and spent a sheltered childhood surrounded by constant care. The balance of his life was taken up with his unremitting devotion to work, and a search for a cure to his illness that took him all over the world. His travel essays were publihsed widely, and his short fiction was gathered in many volumes. His first full-length work of fiction, Treasure Island, was published in 1883 and brought him great fame, which only increased with the publication of The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886). He followed with the Scottish romances Kidnapped (1886) and The Master of Ballantrae (1889). In 1888 he set out with his family for the South Seas, traveling to the leper colony at Molokai, and finally settling in Samoa, where he died.

Bibliographic information