Sketches of the character, manners, and present state of the Highlanders of Scotland: with details of the military service of the Highland regiments, Volume 1

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1822
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Page 17 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground •which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow warmer among the...
Page 17 - We were now treading that illustrious island, which was once the luminary of the Caledonian regions, whence savage clans and roving barbarians derived the benefits of knowledge, and the blessings of religion. To abstract the mind from all local emotion would be impossible, if it were endeavoured, and would be foolish, if it were possible. Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate...
Page 513 - I hope the people of England will be satisfied!" "I hope my country will do me justice!
Page 515 - During the season of repose, his time was devoted to the care and instruction of the Officer and Soldier ; in war, he courted service in every quarter of the globe. Regardless of personal considerations, he esteemed that to which his Country called him, the post of honour ; and by his undaunted spirit, and unconquerable perseverance, he pointed the way to victory.
Page 53 - He whistled shrill, And he was answered from the hill ; Wild as the scream of the curlew, From crag to crag the signal flew. Instant, through copse and heath, arose Bonnets and spears and bended bows : On right, on left, above, below, Sprung up at once the lurking foe ; From shingles...
Page 510 - Upon the left, the enemy at first (contented himself with an attack upon our picquets, which, however, in general maintained their ground. Finding, however, his efforts unavailing on the right and centre, he seemed determined to render the attack upon the left more serious; and had succeeded in obtaining possession of the village, through which the great road to Madrid passes, and which was situated in front of that part of the line. From this post, however, he was soon expelled with...
Page 148 - ... it, or by wrongs and injuries they be so wearied that they be compelled to sell all.
Page 149 - And this is also the cause why victuals be now in many places dearer. Yea, besides this the price of wool is so risen, that poor folks, which were wont to work it and make cloth thereof, be now able to buy none at alL And by this means very many be forced to forsake work and to give themselves to idleness.
Page 148 - All their household stuff, which is very little worth, though it might well abide the sale: yet being suddenly thrust out, they be constrained to sell it for a thing of nought. And when they have wandered...
Page 54 - That whistle garrisoned the glen At once with full five hundred men, As if the yawning hill to heaven A subterranean host had given. Watching their leader's beck and will, All silent there they stood, and still. Like the loose crags, whose threatening mass Lay tottering o'er the hollow pass, As if an infant's touch' could urge Their headlong passage down the verge, With step and weapon forward flung, Upon the mountain-side they hung.

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