Jenny Lind in America

Front Cover
Stringer & Townsend, 1851 - 226 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 25 - Whose empire o'ershadows Atlantic's wide breast, And opens to sunset its gateway of gold! The land of the mountain, the land of the lake, And rivers that roll in magnificent tide — Where the souls of the mighty from slumber awake, And hallow the soil for whose freedom they died! Thou Cradle of Empire! though wide be the foam That severs the land of my fathers and thee, I hear, from thy bosom, the welcome of home, For Song has a home in the hearts of the Free! And long as thy waters shall gleam...
Page 50 - Birdling! Why sing in the forest wide? Say why! say why! Call'st thou the Bridegroom or the Bride? And why? and why? I call no Bridegroom — call no Bride, Although I sing in forest wide, Nor know I why I'm singing.
Page 50 - I'm singing. Birdling! Why is thy heart so blest? Oh say! oh say! Music o'erflowing from this breast? Oh say! oh say! My heart is full, and yet is light. My heart is glad in day or night, Nor know I why I'm singing. Birdling! Why sing you all the day? Oh tell! oh tell! Do any listen to thy lay? Oh tell! oh tell! I care not what my song may be, Now this, now that, I warble free, Nor know, yet must be singing.
Page 90 - ... astonished. He, however, saw immediately that this applause had not been called forth by the orchestra. The tall, slim, thin figure of an aged man — with a grayish blue eye, vivid and sparkling, and a capacious, broad mouth — was slowly advancing up the room. It was Henry Clay. As he moved on, the shouts and applause redoubled. He, bowing on every side, continued his path feebly, and somewhat cautiously. At length he reached his seat, and the applause ceased for a moment. Then a voice at...
Page 25 - And opes to the sunset its gateway of gold ! The land of the mountain, the land of the lake, And rivers that roll in magnificent tide — Where the souls of the mighty from slumber awake, And hallow the soil for whose freedom they died...
Page 24 - I greet with a full heart the Land of the West, Whose Banner of Stars o'er a world is unrolled; Whose empire o'ershadows Atlantic's wide breast, And opens to sunset its gateway of gold! The land of the mountain, the land of the lake, And rivers that roll in magnificent tide — Where the souls of the mighty from slumber awake, And hallow the soil for whose freedom they died!
Page 52 - ... christened Jenny Lind, from the fact that the moment it was filled with water and put on the fire, it began to sing ! In the same city, the coachman who drove the warbler from the railway station to the " Revere House," mounted the steps of that hotel, and, extending his right hand, said :
Page 26 - Barnum then proceeded to read the list of her donations, interrupted at every name by a fresh burst of applause: To the Fire Department Fund $3,000 Musical Fund Society 2,000 Home for the Friendless 500 Society for the Relief of Indigent Females 500 Dramatic Fund Association 500 Home for Colored and Aged Persons 500 Colored and Orphan Association 500 Lying-in Asylum for Destitute Females 500 New York Orphan Asylum 500 Protestant Half-Orphan Asylum 500 Roman Catholic Half-Orphan Asylum 500 Old Ladies...
Page 88 - Fillmore and her daughter, returned with an even more enthusiastic admiration of the Institutions of the States than she had previously entertained. She had been in the society of the man who was the legal head of one of the largest empires that the world has ever known. She had sat and chatted with him, and with his wife and daughter, — she had utterly forgotten his position for the time, and only when she retired did she recollect that she had been in the presence of the man who controlled the...
Page 75 - ... higher key, he has surpassed Art with the more sudden impassioning of Nature. Though, in reading a speech of Webster's, there are passages where your nostrils spread and your blood fires, you may have heard the same speech delivered, with no impression but the unincumbered profoundness of its truth. To use what may seem like a common-place remark, he is as monotonous as thunder — but it is because thunder has no need to be more varied and musical, that Webster leaves the roll of his bass unplayed...

Bibliographic information