In a Mule Litter to the Tomb of Confucius

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J. Nisbet, 1896 - China - 147 pages
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Page 45 - The trees of the New mountain were once beautiful. Being situated, however, in the borders of a large State, they were hewn down with axes and bills ; — and could they retain their beauty ? Still through the activity of the vegetative life day and night, and the nourishing influence of the rain and dew, they were not without buds and sprouts springing forth, but then came the cattle and goats and browsed upon them. To these things is owing the bare and stript appearance of the mountain, which when...
Page 45 - And so also of what properly belongs to man ; — shall it be said that the mind of any man was without benevolence and righteousness ? The way in which a man loses his proper goodness of mind is like the way in which the trees are denuded by axes and bills. Hewn down...
Page 45 - The way in which a man loses his proper goodness of mind is like the way in which the trees are denuded by axes and bills. Hewn down day after day, can it — the mind — retain its beauty? But there is a development of its life day and night, and in the calm air of the morning...
Page 89 - I do not know,' was the reply. ' I have all my life had the heaven over my head, but I do not know its height, and the earth under my feet, but I do not know its thickness. In my serving of Confucius, I am like a thirsty man who goes with his pitcher to the river, and there he drinks his fill, without knowing the river's depth.

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