The History of Canada: Canada under British rule

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Roswell & Hutchinson, 1895 - Canada
 

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Page 152 - Conclude the few observations to which I purposely limit myself, without adverting to your repetition of a language implying a knowledge, on the part of .this Government, that the instructions of your predecessor did not authorize .the arrangement formed by him.
Page 537 - Scarcely had his majesty's troops forced a passage across the Saranac, and ascended the height on which stand the enemy's works, when I had the extreme mortification to hear the shout of victory from the enemy's works, in consequence of the British flag being lowered on board the Confiance and Linnet ; and to see our gun-boats seeking their safety in flight. This...
Page 190 - The first stroke of the tomahawk, the first attempt with the scalping knife, will be the signal of one indiscriminate scene of desolation. No white man, found fighting by the side of an Indian, will be taken prisoner — instant destruction will be his lot. If the dictates of reason, duty, justice, and humanity, cannot prevent the employment of a force which respects no rights and knows no wrong, it will be prevented by a severe and relentless system of retaliation.
Page 545 - Great Britain, than they resolved to wage it in a manner most consonant to the principles of humanity, and to those friendly relations which it was desirable to preserve between the two nations, after the restoration of peace.
Page 312 - ... unspeakable pain that I saw, soon after I got on board the Niagara, the flag of the Lawrence come down, although I was perfectly sensible that she had been defended to the last, and that to have continued to make a show of resistance would have been a wanton sacrifice of the remains of her brave crew.
Page 201 - Some say that nothing could be more desperate than the measure ; but I answer, that the state of the province admitted of nothing but desperate remedies.
Page 323 - Division appears to have been encumbered with an unmanageable load of unnecessary, and forbidden private baggage — while the requisite arrangements for the expeditious, and certain conveyance of the ammunition, and provisions, the sole objects worthy of consideration, appear to have been totally neglected, as well as all those ordinary measures resorted to by officers of intelligence, to retard and impede the advance of a pursuing enemy. The result affords but too fatal a proof of this unjustifiable...
Page 252 - I have the honour to acquaint you, for the information of his excellency the commander of the forces that, in consequence of the commands of his excellency to retaliate, under favourable circumstances, upon the enemy, for his late wanton aggressions on this frontier, I, this morning about seven o'clock, crossed the river St.
Page 276 - Your excellency having been a witness of the zeal and ardent courage of every soldier in the field, it is unnecessary in me to assure your excellency that but one sentiment animated every breast, that of discharging to the utmost of their power their duty to their king and country : but one sentiment of regret and mortification prevailed, on being obliged to quit...
Page 538 - Regent's commands, which had been conveyed to me by your lordship, in your dispatch of the 3d of June last. As the troops concentrated and approached the line of separation between this province and the United States, the American army abandoned its entrenched camp on the river Chazy, at Champlain ; a position I immediately seized, and occupied in force on the 3d instant.

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