A Narrative of a Voyage to Surinam: Of a Residence There During 1805, 1806, and 1807, and of the Author's Return to Europe by the Way of North America

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W. Bulmer, 1810 - Natural history - 282 pages
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Page 112 - After this, he occasionally returns to business until two o'clock, when he goes to a club, of which there are two principal ones. Here he learns the news of the day, takes some refreshment or cordials, and returns home at three to dinner, which is often in the society of his friends. Some have the same custom here, as prevails in the south of Europe, of indulging themselves with a nap in the afternoon, but others prefer a walk.
Page 113 - The lady (or to whom she gives the commission) sings a line containing part of her complaint, or some reflection upon her antagonist ; and this is repeated in a chorus by the attending female slaves, and followed by other lines until it becomes a complete song, between the different parts of which there is a dance ; and the negro females accompany the movements and mark the time with fruit-shells strung on a string like beads. This method of treating the dispute gives at least, to the adversary,...
Page 170 - ... spot between the shoulders, and lies close to the tree ; it looks then exactly like a piece of branch where the rest has been broken off, by which the hunters are often deceived.
Page 250 - I have seen a pair of them at a gentleman's house at Paramaribo which were left quite at liberty. When the female negroes were employed at their needlework, they used to come and sit amongst them, and play with a piece of paper, and afterwards go out to gambol upon the trees, but never went over to the neighbouring gardens ; and they knew well the usual hour of dinner at their master's, when they would come to the gallery, look in at the windows...
Page 23 - The introduction of these reptiles into the islands of Martinique and St. Lucie, is accounted for in the following ingenious manner : ' The original natives of these two islands used to attack the Indians of the coast of South America, and plunder their habitations : the people of the continent, by way of retaliation, caught many venomous snakes in baskets, and carried them over to the islands, where they turned them loose, not only as an act of revenge upon the living, but to continue as a plague...
Page 47 - ... chaunts its sweet notes without fear of molestation. Such are his enjoyments at home. After the great heats of the day are over, he strolls into a beautiful Savannah, which leads into a wilderness, the commencement of that interminable forest, which spreads over the uninhabited part of Guiana : ' Of the many alleys, that are formed here, one, which I frequent the most, winds along a serpentine river, where a number of beautiful butterflies are often hovering over the flowing mirror, and seem...
Page 111 - He rises at six o'clock, and, to enjoy the pleasantness of the morning, takes his breakfast under his piazza, at which he is attended by a number of female negroes, and a boy who presents him with a segar-pipe ; during this time he orders the...
Page 173 - As the natural history of this pretty little animal is not much known, I thought of trying if they would breed in a cage ; but when I returned from my excursion into the country, I found them both dead, perhaps occasioned by the trouble given to procure the wasps' nests for them, though they are here very plentiful : wherefore I can give no further description of them than that they slept all the day long curled together, and fastened by their prehensile tails to one of the perches of the cage. When...
Page iv - ... respect to the healthiness of the colony. We rather suspect that the principal object of the publication of these letters, may be gathered from the following passages : ' The abolition of the Slave Trade has been determined upon by the Parliament of Great Britain: if it should hereafter be found, upon a fair trial, that the Africans themselves do not reap such advantages from it, as. were at first expected, and if at the same time experience should shew, that the colonies are not yet come to...
Page 219 - ... been truly distressing. M. de Sack's voyage to Europe is remarkable for nothing but a most poetical description of a storm, which, when published in its original German, will no doubt be long considered as a proper model for imitation by every manufacturer of horrors in Jena, Gbttingen and Leipsic.

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