Melodious Guile: Fictive Pattern in Poetic Language

Front Cover
Yale University Press, Jul 1, 1990 - Poetry - 262 pages
0 Reviews
Demonstrating a poet's imaginative ear and a critic's range of concern, John Hollander here writes about the "melodious guile" with which poetry speaks to us. Through analysis of formal and rhetorical patterns in examples chosen from the whole spectrum of English and American poetry, Hollander describes how poems frame self'reflexive parables in order to represent realms beyond themselves. "John Hollander, himself a fine poet, is such a generalist; and Melodious Guile, to my mind the best of his critical books, takes its place-along with Donald Davie's Articulate Energy and Winifred Nowottny's The Language Poets Use-among the very few enjoyable and enriching studies of how poetry works."-Alastair Fowler, London Review of Books
 

What people are saying - Write a review

Melodious guile: fictive pattern in poetic language

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

An academic poet adept at poeticizing his academic discourse, Hollander addresses the self-referential nature of poetry by considering how devices such as rhetorical questions and answers, imperatives ... Read full review

Contents

Questions of Poetry
18
Poetic Answers
41
Poetic Imperatives
64
Bondage Work
85
Necessary Hieroglyphs
111
Some Notes on Refrain
130
Spensers Undersong
148
A Long Line
164
The Poetics of Character
194
Examples and Fictions
207
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1990)

John Hollander has edited several Everyman's Library Pocket Poet volumes, including "Robert Frost", "Christmas Poems", "War Poems", "Marriage Poems", "Animal Poems", & "Garden Poems". He is the A. Bartlett Biamatti Professor of English at Yale University, & the author of numerous books of poetry & criticism. He was made a MacArthur Fellow in 1990.

Bibliographic information