Fables

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Lockwood, 1860 - Fables - 231 pages
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Page 21 - ... runs the tale. First, Boreas blows an almost Thracian gale, Thinking, perforce, to steal the man's capote: He loosed it not; but as the cold wind smote More sharply, tighter round him drew the folds, And sheltered by a crag his station holds. But now the Sun at first peered gently forth, And thawed the chills of the uncanny North; Then in their turn his beams more amply plied, . Till sudden heat the clown's endurance tried; Stripping himself, away his cloak he flung: The Sun from Boreas thus...
Page xvii - ... distinguished statesman, the late Right Hon. Sir George Cornewall Lewis. They have since been translated into English verse by the Rev. James Davies, of Moor Court, Herefordshire. This last-named learned scholar supports to its utmost extent the theory of Dr. Bentley, and maintains in the broadest terms " that in any wise the fables of Babrius may claim to be the basis or stock material of all that comes down to our day under the name and credit of ^Esop."* Considerable difference of opinion...
Page 54 - Davies's version, which, though somewhat deficient in freedom, is commendably close to the original : — A mouse into a lidless broth-pot fell : Choked with the grease, and bidding life farewell, He said, ' My fill of meat and drink have I, And all good things ; 'tis time that I should die.
Page 16 - To whom the sweet-voiced nightingale replied: — "Still on these lonesome ridges let me bide; Nor seek to part me from the mountain glen: — I shun, since Athens, man, and haunts of men; To mix with them, their dwelling-place to view, Stirs up old grief, and opens woes anew.
Page 3 - Twas the Golden Age when every brute Had voice articulate, in speech was skilled, And the mid-forests with its synods filled, The tongues of rock and pine-leaf then were free, To ship and sailor then would speak the sea; Sparrows with farmers would shrewd talk maintain; Earth gave all fruits, nor asked for toil again. Mortals and gods were wont to mix as friends, To which conclusion all the teaching tends Of sage old /Esop.
Page 22 - A carter from the village drove his wain. And when it fell into a rugged lane. Inactive stood, nor lent a helping hand, But to that god whom of the heavenly band He really honour'd most, Alcides, prayed : •: Push at your wheels...
Page 20 - THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN BETWIXT the North wind and the Sun arose A contest, which would soonest of his clothes Strip a wayfaring clown, so runs the tale. First, Boreas blows an almost Thracian gale, Thinking, perforce, to steal the man's capote : He loosed it not; but as the cold wind smote More sharply, tighter round him drew the folds, And sheltered 'by a crag his station holds. But now the Sun at first peered gently forth, And thawed the chills of the uncanny North ; Then in their turn his...
Page 20 - THE NORTH WIND AND THE SUN. BETWIXT the North wind and the Sun arose A contest, which would soonest of his clothes Strip a wayfaring clown ; so runs the tale. First Boreas blows an almost Thracian gale, Thinking perforce to steal the man's capote : He loosed it not: but as the cold wind smote More sharply, tighter round him drew the folds, And sheltered by a crag his station holds. But now the Sun at first peered gently forth, And thawed the chills of the uncanny north ; Then in their turn his beams...
Page 105 - Thou shalt have all and each of ocean's gifts ! " " Agreed !" the eagle cries, and lightly lifts The other to the clouds upon her back, Then lets her fall, and on the hill-side crack Her brittle coat of shell. He heard her cry, At the last gasp, " I well deserve to die ! Where was to me of clouds and wings the need, Who on my mother earth could make no speed ?

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